Category Archives: What’s Happening

RSIC’s 2022 Primary Voting Recommendations & Polling Locations

Our goal is to inspire Washoe County Native Voters to vote and achieve the highest Native voter turnout in Nevada’s history. #NativeVote2022 

Here are some recommendations for voting in the 2022 Primary Election. The recommendations were compiled from various sources that endorse candidates. Additionally, in staying consistent with the RSIC’s candidate contributions, recommendations are made for incumbents on the Official Democratic Primary Election Ballot for Federal, State, and Non-Partisan Offices that affect Reno Colony and Hungry Valley residents.

Reno Ballot:

Federal Offices:

  • United Sates Senate: Catherine Cortez Masto
  • United States Representative in Congress, District 2: Elizabeth Mercedes Krause

Statewide Partisan Offices:

  • Governor: Steve Sisolak
  • Lieutenant Governor: Elizabeth “Lisa” Cano
  • State Controller: Ellen Spiegel
  • Attorney General: Aaron D. Ford

District Partisan Offices:

  • State Senate, District 13: Richard “Skip” Daly
  • State Assembly, District 24: Sarah Peters
  • County Commission, District 3: Mariluz Garcia

District Non-Partisan Offices:

  • School Board Trustee, District D: Beth Smith
  • School Board Trustee, District F At-Large: Adam Mayberry

Township Non-Partisan Offices:

  • Justice of the Peace, Reno-Verdi, Department 2: Kendra Bertschy

Hungry Valley Ballot:

Federal Offices:

  • United Sates Senate: Catherine Cortez Masto
  • United States Representative in Congress, District 2: Elizabeth Mercedes Krause

Statewide Partisan Offices:

  • Governor: Steve Sisolak
  • Lieutenant Governor: Elizabeth “Lisa” Cano
  • State Controller: Ellen Spiegel
  • Attorney General: Aaron D. Ford

District Non-Partisan Offices:

  • Regent, University of Nevada, District: John Gwaltney
  • School Board Trustee, District C: Joseph “Joe” Rodriguez
  • School Board Trustee, District F At-Large: Adam Mayberry

RSIC POLLING LOCATIONS:

Primary Election Day, Tuesday June 14th, 7am-7pm.

  1.   RSIC Gym: 34 Reservation Road, Reno, NV 89502
    • Same Day Registration (Tribal ID, Driver License, State ID)
    • In-Person Voting
  2. Hungry Valley Gym: 9075 Eagle Canyon Drive, Sparks, NV 89441 
    • Same Day Registration (Tribal ID, Driver License, State ID)
    • In-Person Voting

“A Violation of Native American Rights”: Archeological Procedures Begin at Thacker Pass Ancestors and Sacred Sites in the Firing Line

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

“A Violation of Native American Rights”:
Archeological Procedures Begin at Thacker Pass
Ancestors and Sacred Sites in the Firing Line

OROVADA, NEVADA (April 18, 2022) — Archeological procedures began at the site of the planned Thacker Pass lithium mine this week in what the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony (RSIC) says it is a violation of Native American rights.

“These procedures are desecrating the resting place of our ancestors in violation of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act [NAGPRA],” says Michon R. Eben, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony. “The Federal Government should be ashamed of the lack of government-to-government consultation by BLM Winnemucca and Far Western Anthropological Research Group, Inc.”

Thacker Pass was the site of a 1865 massacre of Paiutes committed by the U.S. military.

In a letter (attached) the Tribe sent to the archeological firm conducting the dig, Far Western Anthropological Research Group, Inc., the RSIC demands “Far Western to immediately halt the planned archeological digs and refuse to participate in the desecration of Thacker Pass for corporate greed.”

The Thacker Pass lithium mine has become an international scandal since January of last year, when protests began at the site of the mine. Environmentalists, tribes, and ranchers have filed suit against the proposed mine in federal court, alleging violations of various Federal laws, and calling for Congressional investigations into the matter. The project was “fast-tracked” under the Trump administration.

Chairman Arlan Melendez asks, “How would you feel if your loved ones were massacred in a sacred, prayerful area with no closure to their deaths for the profit of stolen land, and now your sacred ancestral lands being uprooted without proper federal consultation for the profit of the largest lithium mine in America? The consultation process with tribal nations must be adhered to.”

“This is a fight for justice, a fight for the planet, and a fight for what is right,” said Will Falk, an attorney for RSIC. “We need everyone to help us in stopping this desecration.”

SUMMARY OF ATTACHED 7-PAGE LETTER:

Reno-Sparks Indian Colony’s (RSIC) outlined a letter of its perspective of the unprincipled proposed excavations that Far Western Anthropological Research Group, Inc. (Far Western) is currently undertaking at the Paiute and Shoshone peoples important Traditional Cultural Property, Thacker Pass.  These archeological procedures include excavating Native American cultural resources, sacred objects and disturbing the resting place of Paiute ancestors massacred on September 12, 1865 Nevada Calvary.  

Thacker Pass Lithium Mine Project (Project) is the nation’s largest and most complex lithium mine.  The Project become an international scandal since January of last year, when protests began at the site of the mine. Environmentalists, tribes, and ranchers have filed suit against the proposed mine in federal court, alleging violations of various Federal laws, and calling for Congressional investigations into the matter. The project was “fast-tracked” under the Trump administration.

If we don’t hold federal agencies, mining companies and archeological contractors accountable for their unethical profitable tactics, then we will watch Nevada become waste land and ongoing exploitation of Indigenous people’s culture for future lithium mines.   Federal undertakings, including mining projects, must include federally recognized tribes throughout the entire process.  

BLM failed to meet its responsibilities under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Native American Graves and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), Archeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA) and National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA).  BLM did not provide tribes who attach cultural and religious significance to Thacker Pass a reasonable opportunity to identify concerns about Native American cultural sites, advise on the identification and evaluation of traditional religious and cultural importance, articulate views on the Thacker Pass Lithium Mine Project’s effects on these Native American sites, and participate in the resolution of adverse effects as required by the NHPA. BLM and Far Western failed to include in its reports, the September 12, 1865 massacre.  There are 100+ documented massacres in the Great Basin from 1864-1868.  This is American History. It is Nevada history.  The Paiute people are important, not just for the artifacts on and in the ground that may yield information and academic acclaim for archeologists.  Taking these artifacts and disturbing burial sites would constitute yet another shameful chapter in a long history of settlers trying to destroy or commit genocide on Native history and culture. 

In the letter, the RSIC reminded Far Western of the archeological ethical principles and the Archeological Institute of America’s Code of Professional Standards. The RSIC further reminded Far Western that by excavating Thacker Pass, Far Western will be demonstrating that major contracts, money and academic papers are more important to its organization than approaching archeology in a moral way and respecting federally recognized Tribe’s legitimate concerns of the desecration of its ancestral’ s past life ways including its sacred sites.

The RSIC requested Far Western to take all these objections into consideration and seriously recognize that we need to re-vision the relationship between Archaeology and Indigenous Peoples.   Central to this is the need for archeological firms to base its work and science on morality and ethics rather than extraction of fast tracked projects that forever negatively adversely affect Native American ancestors, sacred sites and knowledge.  The RSIC requests that Far Western (and any other archeological firm that may be participating in unprincipled excavations) immediately halt the archeological digs and refuse to participate in the desecration of Thacker Pass for corporate greed. Please see attached 7 page RSIC letter in full.

For more information:
Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Media Relations, Bethany Sam: 775-842-2902
Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Tribal Historic Preservation Office
Michon Eben: 775-785-1326 ext. 5430
Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Attorney, Will Falk: 319-830-6086

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About the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony formed a federally recognized government in 1936 under the Indian Reorganization Act.  Located in Reno, Nev., the RSIC consists of 1,206 members from three Great Basin Tribes – the Paiute, Shoshone and Washoe Tribes. The RSIC is a vibrant, diverse organization, which balances traditional teachings and rich culture with contemporary business methods. Our mission is to offer opportunities for tribal members to improve their lives and enhance tribal values by making community programs, services, and projects available.

RSIC to Host a Drive-Thru Collection Site for “Prescription Drug Take Back Day”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Media Phone: 775-842-2902

Reno-Sparks Indian Colony to Host a Drive-Thru Collection Site for

“Prescription Drug Take Back Day”

Reno, Nevada (April 8, 2022) — Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Tribal Health Center’s Behavioral Health Department will participate in the April “Prescription Drug Take Back Day” on April 30th. American Indian populations have proven particularly susceptible to the misuse of prescription drugs. This prevention effort is to help mitigate prescription drug abuse.

The National Prescription Drug Take Back Day addresses a crucial public safety and public health issue. According to the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 9.7 million people misused prescription pain relievers, 4.9 million people misused prescription stimulants, and 5.9 million people misused prescription tranquilizers or sedatives in 2019. The survey also showed that a majority of misused prescription drugs were obtained from family and friends, often from the home medicine cabinet.

“Any drug abuse affects the fabric of the entire community. This is a way for our community to safely dispose of leftover medicines that are languishing in households to divert the misuse or abuse,” Chairman Arlan Melendez stated.  

The Take Back Day events provide an opportunity for everyone to prevent drug addiction and overdose deaths. Collection sites will adhere to local COVID-19 guidelines and regulations in order to maintain the safety of all participants and local law enforcement.

On April 30, 2022 a drive-thru collection site will be set up at 405 Golden Lane, Reno, NV 89502 from 10:00am-2:00pm for collection of expired or unused prescription medication.

In addition to DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, prescription drugs can be disposed of at any of the 11,000 DEA authorized collectors at any time throughout the year.

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony has a medication safe disposal drop box located in the pharmacy of the Reno-Sparks Tribal Health Center. We collect tablets, capsules, patches, and other solid forms of medication. Syringes and other sharps, and illegal drugs cannot be dropped off. This service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

For more information please contact Vanessa Williams, RSTHC Behavioral Health Prevention Outreach Coordinator, at 775-329-5162 ext. 2009 or email vwilliams@rsicclinic.org or Bethany Sam, RSIC Public Relations, at 775-329-2936 or email bsam@rsic.org.

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About the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony formed a federally recognized government in 1936 under the Indian Reorganization Act.  Located in Reno, Nev., the RSIC consists of 1,206 members from three Great Basin Tribes – the Paiute, Shoshone and Washoe Tribes. The RSIC is a vibrant, diverse organization, which balances traditional teachings and rich culture with contemporary business methods. Our mission is to offer opportunities for tribal members to improve their lives and enhance tribal values by making community programs, services, and projects available.

PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE

For Reno-Sparks Indian Colony’s Education Department regarding the P.L. 102-477 Plan.

For more information or if you have questions, please call 775-329-6114