Category Archives: Headlines

“Wounded Souls” Exhibit at 1995 East Second Street: Extracting from the Land and Our Spirits

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – November 9, 2022

Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Exhibit Showcases Mining Industry Impacts on Native Peoples

“Wounded Souls: Extracting from the Land and Our Spirits” Runs from November 8th – March 8, 2023

(Reno, NV) Nevada has a long history as a mining state, but the impacts of extracting gold, silver, and other metals have not been equal for everyone. A new historical exhibit at the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony highlights the impacts of mining on Native people.

“What has brought wealth and job opportunities for some, has often meant the destruction of sacred sites and harm to the living culture of Native people,” says Michon R. Eben, the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer at the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony. “This exhibit is about the wounds we have suffered and also about our resilience in the face of colonization in all its forms.”

Western Mining Action Network Conference Attendees visit RSIC’s THPO & Cultural Resources Program’s “Wounded Souls” Exhibit at 1995 East 2nd Street, Reno, NV 89502

Eben and RSIC THPO staff developed the exhibit, which opens November 8th in celebration of Native American Heritage Month, and is titled “Wounded Souls: Extracting from the Land and Our Spirits.” It includes historic mining equipment, artefacts produced from the Comstock Lode, historical documents and information about the 1872 Mining Law, oral histories of the impacts of archeology and mining on native culture, and an exhibit on Mary and Carrie Dann’s 30-year struggle for Western Shoshone sovereignty and to protect sacred Mount Tenabo.

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony is no stranger to the impacts of mining. The Tribe’s Hungry Valley land base was threatened by a mining operation for kitty litter in the 1990’s, but the Tribe and other Reno-area groups organized and successfully halted the project.

More recently, the Tribe has taken a stand alongside the Burns Paiute Tribe, Summit Lake Paiute Tribe, Winnemucca Indian Colony, and other allies for Thacker Pass, known as “Peehee Mu’huh” in Paiute, a sacred and culturally important site where a Canadian company plans to build an open-pit lithium mine.

Reno-Sparks is a plaintiff in a Federal Court Case for which final oral arguments will take place on January 5th.

A section of the “Wounded Souls” exhibit is dedicated to the ongoing fight at Thacker Pass.

“Wounded Souls” was developed in collaboration with the W. M. Keck Earth Science and Mineral Engineering Museum at University of Nevada Reno, runs through March 8th, and is free to the public.

Viewing hours are Monday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 6 pm and some Saturdays from 11am to

3pm. Please call (775) 785-1326 before your visit to ensure staff will be on-site.

#

About the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony
The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony formed a federally recognized government in 1936 under the Indian Reorganization Act. Located in Reno, Nev., the RSIC consists of 1,294 members from three Great Basin Tribes – the Paiute, Shoshone and Washoe Tribes. The RSIC is a vibrant, diverse organization, which balances traditional teachings and rich culture with contemporary business methods. Our mission is to offer opportunities for tribal members to improve their lives and enhance tribal values by making community programs, services, and projects available; while educating the general public about our history, culture and modern lifestyle.

Three Nations Cannabis Verdi Grand Opening – This Saturday, 11/12 @ 11am

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Media Phone: 775-842-2902

Three Nations Cannabis, owned by Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, Invites Adults 21+ years to the Grand Opening of the Verdi Drive-Thru Dispensary

Verdi, Nevada (November 10, 2022) —Three Nations Cannabis, owned by Reno-Sparks Indian Colony (RSIC), is set to mega launch the drive-thru dispensary located in Verdi, NV with a Grand Opening celebration this Saturday, November 12th. Three Nations Cannabis Verdi cordially invites all adults, 21+ years, who are interested to experience a Native American owned cannabis store with a massive selection of products, including Native American cannabis products, and guaranteed low prices by 10% of their competitors on the daily.

            The Grand Opening festivities is set to begin at 11am at 420 Highway 40 West (exit 2, off I-80 west), hence the store will open its doors at 9am. The store location is on RSIC tribal land and is near the tribe’s (RSIC’s) long-established Tribal Smoke Shop business. The main attractions are giveaways, raffles, special offers, food trucks, Native American vendors, music, etc…

Products to include flower, vapes, edibles, pre-rolls, extract, tincture, plus more. View their complete online menu at www.threenationscannabis.com where customers are able to pre-order for pickup at Three Nations Cannabis Verdi or Three Nations Cannabis South Reno (11570 South Virginia Street).

            “This long awaited accomplishment will lead to increased services for our elders, youth and all tribal members,” Chairman Arlan Melendez stated. “We welcome all adults (21+ years), to be present at our Three Nations Cannabis Verdi Grand Opening and celebrate this milestone together. We look forward to providing a safe & tasty client experience.” 

The dispensaries are a new income resource that is parallel with RSIC’s vision to promote and encourage individual spiritual, physical and emotional health to foster a long, abundant, and prosperous life for RSIC Tribal Members & the Urban Indians RSIC serves. This income resource will be used to offer Tribal Members an opportunity to improve their lives and enhance tribal values by making more community programs, services, and projects available.

            RSIC follows cannabis regulations in compliance with the Cannabis Agreement between the State of Nevada and the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony signed on January 29, 2020.  NRS 223.250 allows the Governor to enter into an agreement with any federally recognized Indian tribe located within the geographical boundaries of Nevada regarding Cannabis.

“Three Nations Cannabis enhances RSIC’s economic diversification strategy that will create well-paying jobs for both tribal members and the general public,” said Chairman Melendez. “It will also help RSIC to invest resources into better elder care, education, health services, housing & infrastructure, language & culture, youth services; the opportunities are infinite.”

            For more information, please call Bethany Sam, RSIC Public Relations, at 775-842-2902 or email bsam@rsic.org.

###
About the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony
The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony formed a federally recognized government in 1936 under the Indian Reorganization Act.  Located in Reno, Nev., the RSIC consists of about 1300 members from three Great Basin Tribes – the Paiute, Shoshone and Washoe Tribes. The RSIC is a vibrant, diverse organization, which balances traditional teachings and rich culture with contemporary business methods. Our mission is to offer opportunities for tribal members to improve their lives and enhance tribal values by making community programs, services, and projects available.

Members of the media: If you would like to be removed from this email list, reply and put “Remove” in the subject line. If we should add someone from your news team, reply, put “Add” in the subject line, and provide their contact info. Thanks.

2022 Mid-Term Voting Recommendations & Polling Locations

RSIC POLLING LOCATIONS:

Early Voting & Ballot Drop Off Locations:

  1.  RSIC Gym: 34 Reservation Road, Reno, NV 89502
    • October 22 – November 2, 10am-6pm
    • November 3 – November 4, 10am-7pm
    • Same Day Registration (Tribal ID, Driver License, State ID)
    • In-Person Voting
  2. Spanish Springs Smoke Shop: 7655 Pyramid Highway, Spanish Springs, NV 89436
    • October 22 – November 4, 10am-5pm
    • BALLOT DROP OFF LOCATION ONLY!

Mid-Term Election Day, Tuesday November 8th, 7am-7pm.

  1.   RSIC Gym: 34 Reservation Road, Reno, NV 89502
    • Same Day Registration (Tribal ID, Driver License, State ID)
    • In-Person Voting
  2. Hungry Valley Gym: 9075 Eagle Canyon Drive, Sparks, NV 89441 
    • Same Day Registration (Tribal ID, Driver License, State ID)
    • In-Person Voting

RSIC’s Ballot Suggestions

Our goal is to inspire Washoe County Native Voters to vote and achieve the highest Native voter turnout in Nevada’s history. #NativeVote2022 

Here are some recommendations for voting in the 2022 Mid-Term Election. The recommendations were compiled from various sources that endorse candidates. Additionally, in staying consistent with the RSIC’s candidate contributions, recommendations are made for incumbents on the Official Democratic Primary Election Ballot for Federal, State, and Non-Partisan Offices that affect Reno Colony and Hungry Valley residents.

Reno Ballot:

Federal Offices:

  • United Sates Senate: Catherine Cortez Masto
  • United States Representative in Congress, District 2: Open

Statewide Partisan Offices:

  • Governor: Steve Sisolak
  • Lieutenant Governor: Elizabeth “Lisa” Cano
  • Secretary of State: Francisco “Cisco” Aguilar
  • State Treasurer: Zach Conine
  • State Controller: Ellen Spiegel
  • Attorney General: Aaron D. Ford

District Partisan Offices:

  • State Senate, District 13: Richard “Skip” Daly
  • State Assembly, District 24: Sarah Peters

County Partisan Offices:

  • County Commission, District 3: Mariluz Garcia
  • County Assessor: Wendy Jauregui-Jackins
  • County District Attorney: Christopher Hicks
  • County Public Administrator: Molly Stewart
  • County Recorder: Kalie Work
  • County Treasurer: Justin Taylor

Statewide Non-Partisan Offices:

  • Justice of the Supreme Court, Seat A: Linda Bell
  • Justice of the Supreme Court, Seat E: Ron D. Parraguirre
  • Court of Appeals Judge, Department 1: Deborah Westbrook
  • Court of the Appeals Judge, Department 2: Michael Gibbons
  • Court of the Appeals Judge, Department 3: Bonnie Bulla

County Non-Partisan Offices:

  • County Sheriff: Darin Balaam

City of Reno Offices:

  • Reno City Attorney: Karl S. Hall
  • Reno Mayor: Hillary Schieve
  • Reno Municipal Court Judge, Department 2: Shelly O’Neill
  • Reno Municipal Court Judge, Department 3: Pete Sferrazza
  • Reno Municipal Court Judge, Department 4: Henry N. Sotelo
  • Reno-Verdi, Justice of the Peace, Department 2: Kendra Bertschy
  • Reno-Verdi, Justice of the Peace, Department 3: Ryan Katherine Sullivan
  • Reno-Verdi, Justice of the Peace, Department 4: Scott Pearson
  • Reno-Verdi, Justice of the Peace, Department 5: David W. Clifton

District Non-Partisan Offices:

  • Regent, University of Nevada, District: John Gwaltney
  • School Board Trustee, District C: Joseph “Joe” Rodriguez
  • School Board Trustee, District F At-Large: Adam Mayberry

Statewide Questions:

  • State Question No. 1: YES
  • State Question No. 2: YES
  • State Question No. 3: NO

Hungry Valley Ballot:

Federal Offices:

  • United Sates Senate: Catherine Cortez Masto
  • United States Representative in Congress, District 2: Open

Statewide Partisan Offices:

  • Governor: Steve Sisolak
  • Lieutenant Governor: Elizabeth “Lisa” Cano
  • Secretary of State: Francisco “Cisco” Aguilar
  • State Treasurer: Zach Conine
  • State Controller: Ellen Spiegel
  • Attorney General: Aaron D. Ford

District Partisan Offices:

  • State Senate, District 14: Ira Hansen
  • State Assembly, District 32: Alexis M. Hansen

County Partisan Offices:

  • County Commission, District 5: Edwin Lyngard
  • County Assessor: Wendy Jauregui-Jackins
  • County District Attorney: Christopher Hicks
  • County Public Administrator: Molly Stewart
  • County Recorder: Kalie Work
  • County Treasurer: Justin Taylor

Statewide Non-Partisan Offices:

  • Justice of the Supreme Court, Seat A: Linda Bell
  • Justice of the Supreme Court, Seat E: Ron D. Parraguirre
  • Court of Appeals Judge, Department 1: Deborah Westbrook
  • Court of the Appeals Judge, Department 2: Michael Gibbons
  • Court of the Appeals Judge, Department 3: Bonnie Bulla

District Non-Partisan Offices:

  • Regent, University of Nevada, District: John Gwaltney
  • School Board Trustee, District C: Joseph “Joe” Rodriguez
  • School Board Trustee, District F At-Large: Adam Mayberry

County Non-Partisan Offices:

  • County Sheriff: Darin Balaam

City of Sparks Offices:

  • Sparks, Justice of the Peace, Department 2: Kevin Higgins
  • Sparks, Justice of the Peace, Department 3: Jessica Longley
  • Sparks, Justice of the Peace, Department 4: Erica N. Flavin

Statewide Questions:

  • State Question No. 1: YES
  • State Question No. 2: YES
  • State Question No. 3: NO

RSIC POLLING LOCATIONS:

Early Voting & Ballot Drop Off Locations:

  1.  RSIC Gym: 34 Reservation Road, Reno, NV 89502
    • October 22 – November 2, 10am-6pm
    • November 3 – November 4, 10am-7pm
    • Same Day Registration (Tribal ID, Driver License, State ID)
    • In-Person Voting
  2. Spanish Springs Smoke Shop: 7655 Pyramid Highway, Spanish Springs, NV 89436
    • October 22 – November 4, 10am-5pm
    • BALLOT DROP OFF LOCATION ONLY!

Mid-Term Election Day, Tuesday November 8th, 7am-7pm.

  1.   RSIC Gym: 34 Reservation Road, Reno, NV 89502
    • Same Day Registration (Tribal ID, Driver License, State ID)
    • In-Person Voting
  2. Hungry Valley Gym: 9075 Eagle Canyon Drive, Sparks, NV 89441 
    • Same Day Registration (Tribal ID, Driver License, State ID)
    • In-Person Voting

COMMUNITY SURVEY 2022

September 27, 2022

TO:      RSIC Community
FROM: Planning Department
RE:      Community Survey Deadline is This Friday, September 30th, 2022

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony (RSIC) Planning Department is conducting a Community Survey for the 2040 Comprehensive Plan and we need your input! The survey is open to all RSIC tribal members, residents, and employees.

Take Quick Survey Here: Community Survey 2022

The purpose of this survey is to obtain community feedback for the new Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Comprehensive Plan. Survey responses will help the Planning Department address community issues and concerns for each of the Comprehensive Plan Elements, such as Land Use and Housing.

Options to complete the survey:

  1. Complete the survey online (preferred).
  • Complete the attached paper version of the survey.  Once completed, you can either:
    • Scan and email the survey to Candace H. Stowell, AICP, Planning Director, at cstowell@rsic.org, or
    • Drop off the survey or mail the survey to the RSIC Planning Department at 1937 Prosperity Street, Reno, NV 89502, or
    • Bring your completed survey to the Tribal Council meeting at the Hungry Valley Recreation Center on September 28.

If you have any questions or need assistance completing the survey, please call the Planning Department at 775-785-1363. The Survey will remain open until Friday, September 30.

Thank you,

RSIC Planning Department.

2022 Numaga Indian Days Powwow

Happening This

Labor Day Weekend!

Don’t miss the nationally acclaimed 34th Annual Numaga Indian Days Pow Wow starting on Thursday, September 1st,  through Sunday, September 4th, in Hungry Valley, NV at 105 Loop Rd, Sparks, NV 89441.

Hungry Valley is 7 miles past Spanish Springs High School on Eagle Canyon Drive. For RSIC mapping, go to https://rsic-planning-rsic.hub.arcgis.com

This FREE, family-friendly annual event is held over Labor Day weekend and features the best Native American dancers, singers and drummers in the country.

Besides the memorable pow wow entertainment, over 50 vendors sell traditional native foods and stunning handcrafted silver work, bead work, baskets and other American Indian art.

History of Numaga Indian Days Pow Wow
The Numaga Indian Days Pow Wow is named after Chief Numaga, the famous Paiute Chief, known for peace. Chief Numaga was a great 19th century leader who had the courage and the vision to counsel against war. Facing severe threats to his people by invading white forces, Numaga repeatedly chose peace. His successful peace negotiations, helped set a precedent for future disputes.

Numaga also has a documented history of trying to preserve the destruction of our aboriginal lands. Numaga called the pine nut groves, the Indian’s orchards and asked whites to collect fallen timber instead of cutting down healthy trees. Unfortunately, Numaga’s early advocacy for Mother Earth fell on deaf ears. Translated from the English language, Numaga means “Give Food.” He passed away in 1871 and is buried in the hills near Wadsworth.

Schedule:
Thursday, 9/1 @ 6pm, Numaga Princess Pageant at Hungry Valley Amphitheater
Friday, 9/2 @ 7pm, Pow Wow Grand Entry
Friday, 9/2 @7pm, Hungry Valley Hand Games
Saturday, 9/3 @ 8am, Warrior Mountain Run & Numaga 3 Mile Walk/Run
Saturday, 9/3 @ 1pm, Pow Wow Grand Entry
Saturday, 9/3 @ TBA, Hungry Valley Hand Games
Saturday, 9/3 @ 6pm, Community Feed
Saturday, 9/3 @ 7pm, Pow Wow Grand Entry
Saturday, 9/3 @ about 9pm, Pow Wow Spotlight Special
Sunday, 9/4 @ 12pm, Pow Wow Grand Entry

Event Location
Hungry Valley
105 Loop Road
Sparks, Nevada 89441

Hungry Valley is 7 miles past Spanish Springs High School on Eagle Canyon Drive. For RSIC mapping, go to https://rsic-planning-rsic.hub.arcgis.com

HOST DRUM: POUNDMAKER, Saskatchewan Canada

STAFF
MC: 
Clifton Goodwill (Plains Cree, Ojibwe & Lakota Pasqua First Nations)
HEAD MAN: Muhjuhtheen Roberts (Choctaw, Chickasaw & Stoney/Nakota Tribes)
HEAD WOMAN: Osamuskwasis Roan (Cree & Tsuu T’ina First Nations)
ARENA DIRECTOR: Michael Grant Sr. (Omaha Tribe)
HEAD JUDGE: Shawn Yazzie (Arizona, USA) & Delia Waskewitch (Onion Lake Sask, CAN)

For Additional Powwow Information:
Vendor Info: Jason Stewart, (775) 399-2177 or jasonstewart245@gmail.com
Princess Contest: Klarissa O’Neil, (775)-432-4570

General Info
:
Anita Talancon (775) 338-3723
Lorri Chasing Crow, (775) 437-2166
Antoinette Thayer, (775)-772-9003

Photo & Media Inquiries: Bethany Sam,  (775)-842-2902 or bsam@rsic.org

Numaga Indian Days Pow Wow
The sound of drums fills the air as hundreds of dancers and participants move around the dance arena, using dance styles and steps that match their dance ‘regalia’.

Men will dress and dance in styles such as Northern and Southern Traditional, Fancy Dance, Grass Dance, and Chicken Dance to name those most commonly used.

Women, likewise will dress in cloth and buckskin outfits in both Northern and Southern Traditional styles, Jingle Dance and Fancy Shawl Dance styles. Inside the pow wow circle, the grand entry which features all the performers, begins with more than a hundred dancers grouped by their dress style led by Native American military Veterans.

In between dances, spectators may take their energy to the hand games–traditional gambling that has been played for thousands of years. It is a guessing game involving animal bones and sticks with a background of songs and drums, used to distract the opposing team.

The Numaga Indian Days Pow Wow features more than 50 vendors selling native foods like fry bread and handcrafted bead work and blankets to share their native culture with the outside world.

Your trip to the to beautiful Hungry Valley will be worth it just for the fry bread.