Category Archives: What’s Happening

2nd Street Striping Starting Soon

Below please find the project update for the week of October 30 and upcoming traffic control and construction activities.

The team will begin permanent striping operations the week of November 6, weather dependent. Some driveway access will be restricted to right in-right out only movements for up to one hour while the paint dries.
Traffic Control through November

  • Lane closures on Glendale Ave. between McCarran Blvd. and Kietzke Lane.
  • Speed limits may be reduced in certain construction zones.
  • Bicyclists are advised to use alternate routes around the work zone.

Traffic control is weather dependent.

For more information please call the project hotline at (775) 352-1920 or email info@GlendaleProject.com.

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Below please find the project update for the week of October 16 and upcoming traffic control and construction activities.

Electrical work is done at a traffic signal on Glendale .

 

Roadway Striping
The project team is working on final striping and raising utilities throughout the project. Temporary striping is used until the final layer of pavement cures, but the layout is the same as the permanent striping. The team anticipates final striping will be complete the first part of November. Utilities located in the ground are lowered during construction to avoid damage from construction activities and raised to the roadway grade to provide access after final improvements.

Traffic Control week of October 23, 2017

  • Restricted turning movements at Rock Blvd.
  • Lane closures on Glendale Ave. between McCarran Blvd. and Kietzke Lane.
  • Speed limits may be reduced in certain construction zones.
  • Bicyclists are advised to use alternate routes around the work zone.

Traffic control is weather dependent.

For more information please call the project hotline at (775) 352-1920 or email info@GlendaleProject.com.

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The northbound and southbound on and off-ramps from I-580 to Glendale Ave./Second Street have been re-opened and will remain open for the duration of the construction project.

The final phases of the construction process, for example permanent striping, will be taking place soon.

Construction Progress Video

The following traffic controls remain in effect:
• Rock Blvd., is open but turn movements are restricted.
• A single lane in each direction remains open on Glendale & Second St., from Kietzke to McCarran. Please consider an alternate route to avoid congestion.
• Bicyclists are advised to use alternate routes around the work zone.

For more information please call the project hotline at (775) 352-1920 or email info@GlendaleProject.com.

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Below please find the project update for the week of October 2 and anticipated traffic control for the week of October 9, 2017.

 

 

 

 


Open Graded Paving
The team will continue placing the final layer of pavement surfacing and temporary striping the week of October 9th. Drivers can expect delays and possible intermittent restricted access. This is the final major paving operation on the project. It takes one full week for the pavement surface to cure and then permanent striping can be installed which will occur the week of October 23. The team will be raising utilities throughout the project limits and performing general maintenance into December. Depending on weather, minor finishing work could occur next spring.

Temporary Ramp Closures
The northbound and southbound on and off-ramps from I-580 to Glendale Ave./Second Street will temporary close Monday, Oct. 9 and Tuesday, Oct. 10 from 6 a.m. until afternoon.

Businesses and residences such as Walmart and the Reno Sparks Indian Colony Smoke Shop will always have access and will remain open. Some intermittent delays and rerouting are inevitable.

Traffic Control week of October 9, 2017
• I-580 Glendale/Second St. on and off-ramps will be temporally closed on Monday and Tuesday morning until afternoon.
• Rock Blvd. is open but turn movements are restricted.
• A single lane in each direction remains open on Glendale & Second St. from Kietzke to McCarran. But, use an alternate route to avoid congestion
• Bicyclists are advised to use alternate routes around the work zone.
• Traffic control is weather dependent.
Business Support

For more information please call the project hotline at (775) 352-1920 or email info@GlendaleProject.com.

 

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Below please find the project update for the week of September 18 and anticipated traffic control for the week of September 25, 2017.

Open grade is a permeable surface that reduces tire splash/spray in wet weather and typically results in smoother surfaces. The high air voids trap road noise reducing tire-road noise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Open Grade
The team will place the final layer of pavement and temporary recessed striping the week of October 2. Drivers can expect delays and possible intermittent restricted access. Flaggers will be on site to help drivers navigate through the work zone. This is the final major paving operation on the project. It takes approximately one week for the striping to cure and then permanent striping will occur the week of Oct. 16. The team will be raising utilities throughout the project limits and performing general maintenance into December. Depending on weather, minor finishing work may occur next spring.

Temporary Night Ramp Closures
The northbound and southbound off-ramp from I-580 to Glendale Ave./Second St., will temporary close from 7:30 pm to 5:30 am from Sunday, Oct. 1 to Thursday, Oct. 5. Businesses including Walmart and the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Smoke Shop remain open.

Traffic Control week of October 2, 2017
• I-580 Glendale Avenue/Second Street northbound and southbound off-ramps are closed from 7:30 pm to 5:30 am. Sunday to Thursday. Please use alternate route.
• Restricted turning movements at Rock Blvd.
• Lane closures on Glendale Ave. between Galletti Way and Kietzke Lane.
• Night time work from 7 pm to 5 am.
• Traffic is reduced to one lane in each direction from McCarran Blvd. to Kietzke Lane
• Speed limits may be reduced in certain construction zones.
• Bicyclists are advised to use alternate routes around the work zone.
• Traffic control is weather dependent.

For more information please call the project hotline at (775) 352-1920 or email info@GlendaleProject.com.


 

Below please find the project update for the week of September 25 and anticipated traffic control for the week of October 2, 2017

New pavement on Glendale Ave./Second Street at I-580.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Second Street off-ramp from southbound Interstate 580 is OPEN. The ramp has been closed since Sept. 6 as crews reconstruct Second Street in the area. Drivers will see improvements immediately when they exit onto the new, smoother surface on Glendale Ave. / 2nd Street.

Final Paving
Paving of the final top surface of the roadway is anticipated to occur the week of October 2. This operation is temperature sensitive and may be completed during the day. Drivers are encouraged to use an alternate route and should expect minor delays throughout the project area. Turning movements will be restricted.

Traffic Control week of September 25, 2017
* Restricted turning movements at Rock Blvd
* Lane closures on Glendale Ave., between Galletti Way and Kietzke Lane
* Night time work continues from 7 p.m. to 5 a.m.
* Traffic is reduced to one lane in each direction from McCarran Blvd., to Kietzke Lane
* Speed limits may be reduced in certain construction zones
* Bicyclists are advised to use alternate routes around the work zone
* Traffic control is weather dependent


Utility work continues on Second Street.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I-580 Southbound Off-Ramp CLOSED
The southbound off-ramp from I-580 to Second Street will close 24 hours a day, seven days a week through approximately Thursday, September 21, 2017.  Businesses including Walmart and the Reno Sparks Indian Colony Smoke Shop remain open.

Traffic Control week of September 18, 2017
•    Restricted turning movements at Rock Blvd.
•    I-580 Glendale Avenue/Second Street southbound off-ramp is closed.
•    Lane closures on Glendale Ave. between Galletti Way and Kietzke Lane.
•    Night time work continues from 7 pm to 5 am.
•    Traffic is reduced to one lane in each direction from McCarran Blvd. to Kietzke Lane
•    Speed limits may be reduced in certain construction zones.
•    Bicyclists are advised to use alternate routes around the work zone.
•    Traffic control is weather dependent.

Utility work continues on Second Street

Flashing Red Signal at Rock Blvd
There is one travel lane open in each direction: north and south on Rock Blvd. at Glendale Ave. Turning movements are restricted and there is a flashing red signal condition at the intersection.  Flashing red signals are treated the same as stop signs. The signal will be fully operational after the team installs median islands, paves open grade and places permanent striping. These operations are in process and will be complete in early to mid-October, depending on weather. Please use caution through the intersection.

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Below please find the project update for the week of September 4 and anticipated traffic control for the week of September 11, 2017:

New signals and concrete intersection at Rock Blvd.

 

I-580 Southbound Off-Ramp CLOSED
The southbound off-ramp from I-580 to Second Street will close 24 hours a day, seven days a week through approximately Thursday, September 21, 2017.  Businesses including Walmart and the Reno Sparks Indian Colony Smoke Shop remain open.

Traffic Control week of September 11, 2017

  • I-580 Glendale Avenue/Second Street southbound off-ramp is closed. Please use alternate route.
  • Lane closures on Glendale Ave. between Galletti Way and Kietzke Lane.
  • Night time work begins from 7 pm to 5 am.
  • Traffic is reduced to one lane in each direction from McCarran Blvd. to Kietzke Lane
  • Speed limits may be reduced in certain construction zones.
  • Bicyclists are advised to use alternate routes around the work zone.
  • Traffic control is weather dependent.

 

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New pavement on the south side of Glendale Ave./Second Street.

 

The I-580 northbound on and off ramps and the southbound on ramp at Glendale Avenue/Second Street are OPEN.

Beginning Wednesday, September 6, the southbound off-ramp from I-580 to Second Street will close 24 hours a day, seven days a week through approximately Thursday, September 21, 2017.

Businesses including Walmart and the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Smoke Shop remain open.

  Traffic Control week of September 5, 2017

  • I-580 Glendale Avenue/Second Street southbound off-ramp is closed. Please use alternate route.
  • Lane closures on Glendale Ave. between Galletti Way and Kietzke Lane.
  • South Rock Blvd. is closed at Glendale Ave. Detour in place. Rock Blvd. is scheduled to reopen after the Labor Day holiday.
  • Night time work begins from 7 p.m. to 5 a.m.
  • Traffic is reduced to one lane in each direction from McCarran Blvd. to Kietzke Lane
  • Speed limits may be reduced in certain construction zones.
  • Bicyclists are advised to use alternate routes around the work zone.

Traffic control is weather dependent.

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Crews pour concrete at Glendale Ave. and Rock Blvd.

I-580 Northbound Glendale Ave.
Off-Ramp to Open Ahead of Schedule
The project team will open the Glendale Avenue/Second Street off-ramp from I-580 northbound late Friday evening, August 25 around 9 pm. Glendale Ave. will remain under construction and drivers are encouraged to use extra caution in the work zone and expect minor delays and congestion. The remaining ramps (southbound and northbound on-ramps) are anticipated to open August 31.

Burning Man Drivers can expect increased traffic toward the end of this week with the arrival of Burning Man attendees. Please pay attention and watch for workers, obey traffic signs and laws and slow down in construction zones.

 

Traffic Control week of August 28, 2017

  • I-580 and Glendale Avenue/Second Street southbound on-ramp and northbound on-ramp are closed 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Marked detours are available via Mill Street and Rock Boulevard.
  • Lane closures on Glendale Ave. between Galletti Way and Kietzke Lane.
  • South Rock Blvd. is closed at Glendale Ave. Detour in place. Rock Blvd. is scheduled to reopen around the Labor Day holiday.
  • Night time work begins from 7 pm to 5 am.
  • No free right turns at northbound Kietzke Lane to eastbound Glendale Ave.
  • Traffic is reduced to one lane in each direction from McCarran Blvd. to Kietzke Lane
  • Speed limits may be reduced in certain construction zones.
  • Bicyclists are advised to use alternate routes around the work zone.
  • Traffic control is weather dependent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second Street Project Update
This week the project team began removing the old asphalt from the I-580 ramps west to Kietzke Lane.  The team is working on the south side of the roadway and is scheduled to pave the week of August 21. After paving the south side, crews will move east towards Galletti Way and then move to the north side of the roadway between Walmart and Kietzke Lane for removals around August 31.  When crews are working on the south side, the I-580 southbound off-ramp will be closed. I-580 and Glendale Avenue/Second Street southbound on-ramp and both the northbound on and off-ramp will be open.

Rock Blvd. Update
Crews are working to make the final concrete pours at Rock Blvd. around August 25. Once the concrete reaches strength, between 8 and 10 days, the team will install median islands, complete the signal system, place striping, and open the roadway.  We sincerely appreciate the patience of the community and businesses on and around Rock Blvd.

Burning Man
Drivers can expect increased traffic toward the end of this week with the arrival of Burning Man attendees. Please pay attention and watch for workers, obey traffic signs and laws and slow down in construction zones.

Traffic Control week of August 21, 2017

  • I-580 and Glendale Avenue/Second Street southbound on-ramp and both the northbound on and off-ramp close 24 hours a day, seven days a week through the end of August.
  • Lane closures on Glendale Ave. between Galletti Way and Kietzke Lane.
  • South Rock Blvd. is closed at Glendale Ave./Second Street. Detour in place. Rock Blvd. is scheduled to reopen around the Labor Day holiday.
  • Night time work begins from 7 pm to 5 am.
  • No free right turns at northbound Kietzke Lane to eastbound Glendale Ave.
  • Traffic is reduced to one lane in each direction from McCarran Blvd. to Kietzke Lane
  • Speed limits may be reduced in certain construction zones.
  • Bicyclists are advised to use alternate routes around the work zone.
  • Traffic control is weather dependent.

Business Support
Please support your neighborhood businesses in the project corridor. Sign up to receive project updates at GlendaleProject.com and you are eligible to receive a $25 gift card to a participating local business of your choice!  One gift card distributed every week during construction.

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Beginning Monday, August 14, Interstate 580 ramp closures and surface street lane shifts will take place as part of the NDOT construction. This construction may impact residents and visitors coming to and from the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony.

See the map below which shows the suggested detour routes as the southbound on-ramp exiting  the Colony and both the northbound on and off-ramp between I-580 and Glendale Avenue/Second Street will close 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

However, the southbound I-580 off ramp getting into the Colony will remain open during this time.

Also, major construction will continue on Second Street/Glendale Avenue between Kietzke Lane and Galletti Way. The road will remain open to traffic, but both directions of traffic will first be shifted to the north side through the road work zone.

November at the RSIC

November means:

  • National Adoption Awareness Month
  • National Caregivers Appreciation Month
  • National Diabetes Awareness Month
  • National Epilepsy Month
  • National Model Railroad Month
  • National Novel Writing Month
  • Peanut Butter Lovers Month
  • Real Jewelry Month
  • National Sleep Comfort Month
  • Aviation History Month
  • Child Safety Protection Month
  • National Lung Cancer Awareness Month

1    WEDNESDAY
Elder Home Training, 10 a.m.
Fun Interval Training, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Balancing Your Life & Diabetes Group Education, RSTHC, 12:10 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Essential Oils for Beginners, RSTHC, 5 p.m.
Spinning With Michelle, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Law & Order Committee, Tribal Court, 6 p.m.
2    THURSDAY

Elder Hot Springs, Carson Hot Spring, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Cardio Boxing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
3    FRIDAY
Native Art Classes, RSTHC Behavioral Health, 9 a.m.
Tai Chi with Christian, 3NWC, Noon
Elder Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Spartan Training, 3NWC, 5 p.m.
4    SATURDAY
Tribal Election 7 am. – 7 p.m.
Youth Basketball Clinic, Hungry Valley Gym, 10 a.m.
6    MONDAY
Mammovan, RSTHC, 8 a.m.
Education Advisory Committee meeting, Education Conference Room, Noon
Elder Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Senior Advisory Committee meeting, Senior Center, 1 p.m.
Enrollment Advisory Committee meeting, Enrollment Office, 5:30 p.m.
RSIC Veterans Color Guard meeting, 34 Reservation Rd., 6 p.m.
7    TUESDAY
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Mini Workout, 3NWC, 12:145 p.m.
Cooking Class, Nothing To It!, 6 p.m.
8    WEDNESDAY
Balancing Your Life & Diabetes Group Education, RSTHC, 12:10 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Rethink Your Drink, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.
9    THURSDAY
Elder Hot Springs, Carson Hot Spring, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Mini Workout, 3NWC, 12:145 p.m.
10  FRIDAY
Veterans Day Observed, RSIC Administration Offices Closed
11  SATURDAY
Veterans Day Parade, Downtown Reno, 11 a.m.
Burton Pete Art Exhibit Opens, THPO, 1995 East 2nd St., 12-4 p.m.
Veterans Day Dinner, RSIC Gym, 6 p.m.
13  MONDAY
Elder Home Training, 10 a.m.
Elder Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
14  TUESDAY
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Mini Workout, 3NWC, 12:145 p.m.
Grocery Store Tour, RSTHC, 6 p.m.
15  WEDNESDAY
Elder Home Training, 10 a.m.
Chair Volleyball, Reno Gym, 10 a.m.
Balancing Your Life & Diabetes Group Education, RSTHC, 12:10 p.m.
Fun Interval Training, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Spinning With Michelle, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Tribal Council Meeting, 34 Reservation Rd., 6 p.m.
16  THURSDAY
Great American Smoke Out
Team Weight Management First Weigh In, RSTHC, 8 a.m.
Elder Hot Springs, Carson Hot Spring, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Mini Workout, 3NWC, 12:145 p.m.
Cardio Boxing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Healthy Holiday Eating & Oils, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.
17  FRIDAY
Team Weight Management Weigh In, RSTHC, 8 a.m.
Native Art Classes, RSTHC Behavioral Health, 9 a.m.
Tai Chi with Christian, 3NWC, Noon
Elder Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Spartan Training, 3NWC, 5 p.m.
18  SATURDAY
Youth Basketball Clinic, Hungry Valley Gym, 10 a.m.
Archives & Records Preserving Our Family’s History,
34 Reservation Rd., Multipurpose Room, 10 a.m.
19  SUNDAY
Thanksgiving Celebration, Hungry Valley Christian Fellowship, 10:30 a.m.
20  MONDAY
Christmas Distribution, 34 Reservation Rd., Multipurpose Room, 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Elder Home Training, 10 a.m.
Elder Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
21  TUESDAY
Commodity Distribution, Senior Center, 8 a.m.
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Mini Workout, 3NWC, 12:145 p.m.
Executive Health Board meeting, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.
22  WEDNESDAY
Washoe County School District Thanksgiving Break
Thanksgiving Celebration, RSIC Administration Offices Closed at noon
23  THURSDAY
Thanksgiving Day, RSIC Administration Offices Closed
Washoe County School District Thanksgiving Break
24  FRIDAY
Washoe County School District Thanksgiving Break
Thanksgiving Celebration, RSIC Administration Offices Closed
Eagle Wings After Thanksgiving Fair, RSIC Gym
N7 Nevada Women’s Basketball, Lawler Events Center, 2 p.m.
27  MONDAY
Elder Home Training, 10 a.m.
Elder Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Housing Advisory Board Meeting, Hungry Valley Recreation Center, 6 p.m.
Archery, RSTHC, 6 p.m.
28 TUESDAY
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Chair-Based Yoga, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Mini Workout, 3NWC, 12:145 p.m.
29  WEDNESDAY
Elder Home Training, 10 a.m.
Balancing Your Life & Diabetes Group Education, RSTHC, 12:10 p.m.
Fun Interval Training, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Spinning With Michelle, 3NWC, 5:45 p.m.
Economic Development Meeting, 34 Reservation Rd., 6 p.m.
N7 Nevada Men’s Basketball, Lawler Events Center, 7 p.m.
30  THURSDAY
Elder Hot Springs, Carson Hot Spring, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Mini Workout, 3NWC, 12:145 p.m.
Talking Circle, RSTHC Behavioral Health Division, 4 p.m.
Cardio Boxing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Living in Balance Diabetes Jeopardy, 5:30 p.m.
 

RSTHC Emergency Exercise Helps Staff Train, Fends Off Flu

Reno, Nev. In a four hour period, during “Operation Take Your Best Shot” the Reno-Sparks Tribal Health Center staff inoculated 192 patients for the flu, all the while preparing for a potential real-life emergency.

“This was an ideal situation,” said Andrea Johnson-Harper, Director of the Reno-Sparks Tribal Health Center (RSTHC).  “Our staff will benefit from the mock drill, while nearly 200 of our patients not only can got a flu shot to stave off future illness, but they also got a glimpse of the inner workings of our emergency plan.”

As a recent regional influenza report paints a picture of just how dangerous and deadly the flu is, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony in partnership with the Washoe County Health District for the second year, performed the  joint emergency drill  to prepare for the possibility of an epidemic.

Suzanne Thomas, the RSIC Human Resources Clerk, smiles after being vaccinated by one of the volunteer nurses helping with Operation Take Your Best Shot.

All RSIC health care divisions and emergency respondors—tribal police, public works, public relations and emergency services—tried to vaccinate as many people as possible from 1 – 4 p.m., at the Tribal facility located at 1715 Kuenzli St.

Statistics released from the Washoe County Health District 2016-17 Influenza Surveillance Report show that out of 2,408 laboratory-confirmed influenza cases in Washoe County last flu season, 312 (13 percent) were hospitalized for more than 24 hours and eight cases patients died.

A 2010 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study indicated that American Indians are four times more likely to die of the flu than other Americans, but experts aren’t sure why. Dr. John Redd of the Indian Health Service (IHS) said that since American Indians are more likely to have chronic health conditions such as diabetes and asthma, that is one possible reason that could explain the high death rates.

The CDC recommends flu shots to reduce chances of becoming sick with the flu and passing it along to others.  The national health protection agency states that if you have received a flu shot it can also reduce the severity of symptoms if you do catch the flu.

In the scenario for Operation Take Your Best Shot, the Washoe County Health District will have declared a health emergency due to the epidemic influenza.  RSIC community members, the Urban Indian population and RSIC employees were invited to get his/her annual flu shot while the staff tests its preparedness plan.

In addition, a mock media briefing with a description of the identified threat, statistics on the epidemic, real-time inoculation numbers, as well as a question and answer session was held in the 3Nations Wellness Center within the RSTHC.

The RSTHC is a tribally-owned and operated comprehensive clinic. The health center is committed to enhancing the quality of life of all of American Indians by providing a culturally competent and patient-centered continuum of care.

The RSTHC has a staff of over 100 employees and recorded over 50,000 patient encounters
in 2016. These encounters ranged from a simple check-up to chronic and acute conditions, or pre-natal visits, to name just a few.

Since opening in its new location in 2008, this 65,000-square-foot clinic offers specialty care in podiatry, ophthalmology, physical therapy, diabetes treatment and awareness, women’s health, psychiatry, substance abuse counseling, and more.
For additional information about Operation Take Your Best Shot, the RSIC community, culture, departments, economic developments, business opportunities and services, please contact Stacey Montooth on her cell phone at 775/842-2902, at her desk at 775/329-2936, ext. 3268 or by email at smontooth@rsic.org .

Subway Restaurant Opens on Tribal Land

The First Fresh Forward Subway® in Northern Nevada is open.

The new restaurant is located at 420 Old Highway 40W, near the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony’s  Smoke Shop IV in Verdi, Nev.

On Oct. 1, the eatery unveiled its new Subway® Fresh Forward design, including features such as self-ordering kiosks for quick order and accessibility, Wi-Fi, curated music, a Free Style machine with 100 flavors, and a designated area for easy mobile order pickups.

The Subway® Fresh Forward design has improved each aspect of the customer experience –from how the food is displayed, ordered, served or picked-up. The redesigned
location reflects today’s modern food culture – complete with curated music and lighting,
contemporary work spaces that allow Sandwich Artists™ to be more efficient, and open vegetable displays that showcase the brand’s commitment to serving fresh produce.

“It only made sense for the in-shop atmosphere to match the freshness of our food. As we continue to focus on providing flavorful and new products, we want our guests to not only taste our menu, but have a total sensational experience,” said Shawn Hazeghazam, Franchisee for Subway® . “This particular location will also offer one of the first 3rd-generation kiosk drive-thrus in the region, which allows customers who are deaf and hard of hearing to place, pay for, and receive their orders in a fast, efficient, hassle-free way.”

The 3rd-generation kiosk drive thru is touchscreen and requires zero interaction with an intercom, creating an easy and frictionless experience for customers. The drive-thru kiosk will be available for use 24 hours a day, Monday through Sunday.

The Subway® restaurant location owner, Hazeghazam, has a  history with the brand which dates back to his high school years where he learned the ropes by working at a nearby Subway®.

He officially became a franchisee in 2004 and currently owns 13 Subway® restaurants, in addition to serving as the board chair in the Reno market and a board member in the Sacramento, Calif., market.

 

Wildfires Sear Northern Nevada, Edge Hungry Valley

It has been called a wildfire season on steroids, and Hungry Valley Volunteer Fire Management Coordinator Lance Chantler agrees that 2017 has been like no other.

“There are so many volatile fuels—cheat grass, sage brush, even juniper, which can start a fire very easily,” Chantler said. “All conditions indicate that in the coming weeks and months, conditions will remain very dry and any spark can start a fire, so we will remain vigilante.”

Indeed, residents of Hungry Valley saw firsthand the uncertainty and daunting anxiety which accompanies wildfire as the Long Valley Fire skirted our tribal community last month.

Sparked on July 11, the Long Valley Fire took 10 days of intense firefighting against unpredictable winds, extremely high temperatures, and saturating humidity finally to control the blaze which burnt  83,733 acres, or about 131 square miles.

For the Hungry Valley residents, besides the plumes of smoke, the glow of the Long Valley Fire could be seen after sundown which added to the unease.

“As per our protocols, we were in direct communication with the Long Valley Command Post,” Chantler said. “We have great partners in the SoCal Fire, Bureau of Land Management and all the area agencies which were equipped and ready had the fire remained dynamic and reached our trigger point, which it never did.”

In addition to the fire department, other Reno-Sparks Indian Colony representatives attended the daily operational briefings and the planning briefings. Throughout the active event, RSIC Emergency Management Services including law enforcement, public works, housing and public information personnel were on call.

The Long Valley Fire started near the California / Nevada border town of Doyle and travelled southeast toward Moonstone and Winnemucca Ranch roads.

The fire burned into the north end of Spanish Springs, and in its later stages, the fire moved eastward toward Pyramid Lake. Advisory evacuation orders were issued for Sutcliff, Grass Valley and Palomino Valley.

At one point Pyramid Highway, SR 445, was closed in both directions just north of SR 446 before the fire was contained on Tule Ridge and Dogskin Mountains.

Since the Long Valley Fire in late July, the Hungry Valley Fire Department was first on the scene and the lead agency, at two small fires, one on and one off the Hungry Valley land base.

“Our crew did an excellent job in especially difficult conditions, containing a 13.62 acre fire on the reservation,” Chantler said. “Since we had been working nearly two straight weeks, this effort was especially significant.”

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With continued high temperatures, winds and low humidity, Northern Nevada and much of the entire western part of the United States has endured several red flag warning days.

A Red Flag Warning is a forecast warning issued by the United States National Weather Service to inform area firefighting and land management agencies that conditions are ideal for wildland fire combustion, and rapid spread.

See the following link for red flag warnings: https://forecast.weather.gov/wwamap/wwatxtget.php?cwa=usa&wwa=Red%20Flag%20Warning

In addition, warnings and updates about regional wildfires will be sent via the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony’s emergency alert system, via employee email, and at the Colony’s website.

Please remember, wildfire conditions can change quickly without warning and human interference can threaten lives.

“We have had reports of people parking on Eagle Canyon road to watch the fires,” said RSIC / Hungry Valley Fire Management Coordinator Lance Chantler.  “Blocking access roads is a hazard to responders and ultimately, the community.

He said that during the nearby Prater Fire in Sparks, so many cars blocked the road that law enforcement had to assist.

Chantler also emphasized that drones complicate and disrupt emergency efforts. â

“Drone use during a fire needs to stop,” Chantler said. “A drone anywhere in the Valley could hamper firefighting aircraft.”

Residents living in or around a fire area like Hungry Valley, can monitor conditions at the following link:     https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/

Also KOH AM radio 780 is our civil alert emergency radio. Tune in to get breaking news.

Finally, to sign up for alerts, contact RSIC Emergency Services Manager, David Hunkup at dhunkup@rsic.org or by phone at: (775) 997-3524.

The cause of the Long Valley Fire is still under investigation.

 

 

 

Annual Senior Fun Day Bonds Elders, Community

In Native American tribal communities, elders are the wisdom-keepers as they know our history, know our culture and educate the next generation.

For the Paiute, Shoshone and Washoe people, elders are held in the highest regard.

Nowhere was that more evident than at the recent Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Senior Fun Day.

Organized and managed by the RSIC Senior Program, the annual event drew over 350 participants from as far away as Bishop, Calif., and Fort McDermitt, which straddles the Oregon-Nevada border.

Teresa Bill, one of the RSIC staff members who helps orchestrate the event, said that the mission for Senior Fun Day is simple.

“We have elders from so many different reservations this gives them an chance to see family and friends and catch up,” Bill said. “When we come together, we learn more and really, it is just to have fun.”

That sentiment was echoed and celebrated from 10 a.m., until the last visitor left the RSIC Gym at 3 p.m.

Plus, it was the principle of Reno-Sparks Indian Colony (RSIC) Chairman Arlan D. Melendez’s welcoming remarks.

“It doesn’t matter where you’re from, we are all Native, and we are all family,” Chairman Melendez said. “Today’s event shows that right here.”

Besides meeting and greeting friends from afar, the participants showed off their personalities by wearing unique hats that culminated with a hat contest via loudest applause.

Many of the elders played chair volleyball. Everyone enjoyed the catered lunch compliments of Bertha Miranda’s Mexican Food Restaurant and Cantina. There also was bingo with prizes as well as many information booths with souvenirs and important materials to take home.

“It overwhelms me and I feel so good in my heart to see so many family and friends,” said Reynelda James, an elder from Pyramid Lake. “We don’t see everyone that often so this is a blessing.”

Furthermore, two elders from faraway Bridgeport, Calif., not only participated in all the Senior Fun Day activities, but 94-year-old Madeline Stevens Lundy and 91-year-old Joyce Glazier took in an art exhibit: The Culture of Weaving: Traditional Baskets in Transition, Paiute, Shoshone & Washoe Baskets which is housed through the end of the month by the RSIC Cultural Resources Program/THPO.

Bill, who often identifies and organizes outings for the RSIC Senior Program, explained that the coming to Reno adds a special dimension to the day.
“Since the RSIC senior center is so centralized, many of the elders take the opportunity to shop and see things in the city,” Bill said. “That helps us get so many people to attend.”

Certainly, Tribes are in the best position to provide services to Native elders, and considering the future growing population of older Americans, that is not an easy job.

According to a November 2015 report by the American Association of Retired Person’s Public Policy Institute, by 2050, the number of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) ages 65 and older will more than triple, and the number of those 85 and older will increase sevenfold–from 42,000 in 2012 to 300,000 in 2050.

Today, more than 5.2 million United States citizens identify as American Indian / Alaska Native (AI/ AN), either alone or combined with other races.

Heartbreakingly, almost twice as many older AI/ANs are uninsured than are people in the same-age US population (16 percent versus 8.5 percent). A larger percentage of AI/ANs ages 50-plus receive Medicaid or use Veterans Affairs coverage, and 22 percent receive care provided by the Indian Health Service.

In areas like Reno-Sparks, the number and proportion of AI/ANs (of all ages) who reside in urban areas have increased 34 percent from 2000 to 2010.

Today, 44 percent of AI/ANs ages 50 and over reside on tribal lands. Alaska has the highest proportion of AI/ANs ages 50 and over (14 percent), followed by Oklahoma, New Mexico, South Dakota, and Montana. California has the most AI/ANs ages 50 and over (nearly 172,000), followed by Oklahoma, Texas, Arizona and New Mexico.

Of course, the federal government has a trust responsibility to AI/ANs that includes a legal obligation to protect treaty rights, lands, assets, and resources, plus a duty to carry out the mandates of federal law to AI/ AN people, and our elders are at the core of our communities. However, these same elders comprise the most economically disadvantaged group in the nation and are at increasing risk of financial exploitation and neglect.

To combat this crisis, the National Indian Council on Aging (NICOA) was established in 1976 by Tribal Leaders to advocate for improved comprehensive health, social services and economic wellbeing for our elders.

“In our culture, we hold our elders in the highest regard,” said Brendan Able, the RSIC Senior Center Activities Coordinator. “Typically, our youth have the energy while the elders exercise their wisdom, which guides us all.”

Able said that an elder–man or woman–is not elected or appointed, but always is widely recognized and highly respected for their wisdom and spiritual leadership.

“Our elders often are known for being the kind of people who have paid attention and gaining knowledge and wisdom from life,” Abel said. “Certainly, we feel that on Senior Fun Day.”

 

Native Culture, Artown Create Closing Night Nationhood

The mission of Artown is to create a climate for the cultural rebirth of our region, the closing night of the month-long celebration was a microcosm of that goal.
To warmup 1,000-plus spectators, attendees were treated to dances and songs which have been handed down from generation-to-generation for thousands of years compliments of Lois Kane and the Eagle Wing Pageant Dancers.

Toddlers, teens, and award winning pow wow dancers dazzled the crowd with colorful regalia and energetic moves all in sync with two astounding drum groups: local talent Young Chiefs and the all-women drum group The Mankillers.

Plus the food options were notable—Indian Tacos or pine nut ice cream with Espresso, plus typical fair treats and several beverages to keep hydrated during the 101 degree heat.

All the while, an abundance of Native fine art, Native crafts, and Native merchandise beckoned visitors to explore the vendor booths which were filled with cultural treasures created with inspiration from the rich, matchless Native American culture that has flourished for millennia.

While the crowd jockeyed for optimal seating for the night’s finale, the next 15 people honored by the Reno People Project were introduced (see page 8 for complete biographies). The ceremony held on the Wingfield park stage, was part of the City of Reno’s year-long celebration of its 150th birthday.

Following the Native way, the free public event paused for Pyramid Lake elder Charlotte Harry to offer a prayer in her Paiute language.  Also, her son, Norman Harry, who is on Artown’s Board of Directors, played his hand drum and sang before introducing the main event, A Tribe Called Red.

For nearly a decade, A Tribe Called Red has been blended Native American pow wow vocals and drums with electronic dance music. Since time immemorial, Indigenous people engaged in self expression through their unique melodic songs with specific scale patterns and rhythm. From Ottawa, Canada, A Tribe Called Red has created tracks that blend traditional Native music sounds with hip hop, reggae, plus techno builds and breaks.

The fresh, electronic sounds are enough to engage the under 30-generations, however, the Native artists of the Nipissing First Nation, the Cayuga First Nation and Six Nations of the Grand River, infuse a political message with their exceedingly danceable sound.

The work of A Tribe Called Red might quite possibly be the purest, most successful blend of American Indian traditional sound with the cutting edge passion of modern day activists.

Spawned from Idle No More, fueled by the Water Protectors and the No DAPL movement, A Tribe Called Red’s skillful mix of traditional vocals with innovative, electronic compositions has never sounded better.

On July 31, the very brown crowd experiencing the final evening of Artown immediately reacted to the music.

Furthermore, the concert-goers overwhelmingly expressed their endorsement when the male trio invited three local pow wow dancers—Teresa, Tziavi and Pasutyva Melendez–to join the group on stage.

Soaring to the beat, the jingle dancer and two fancy dancers decorated the stage with additional flare and energy.

“There are a lot of like-minded people and we are trying to rally them, in the way only Indigenous people know how to rally people,” DJ NDN also called Ian Campeau told Mic, an on-line magazine.  “That’s creating nationhoods.”

And that is what Artown did in Reno on the closing night of its month-long party.

 

Inaugural Native American Basketball Showcase Gives Student Athletes Chance to Perform

Native American basketball showcase gives players a chance to show their skills
(click link to News 4 coverage)

In an effort to promote and show public support for young people, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony invited 50 student athletes and a dozen educators to coach these players in the 1st Annual All-Native American High School Basketball Showcase.

Among the United States’ 565 federal recognized American Indian tribes, Native Americans are the most under-represented ethnicity on college athletics teams. Despite the difficulties finding their way onto an NCAA team, let alone becoming a high profile athlete, history is dotted with famous Native Americans athletes and their noteworthy accomplishments.

In the 20th century, Jim Thorpe, a Sac & Fox Indian, won two Olympic gold medals, played professional baseball and football and became the first president of the league that would become the NFL. Billy Mills, a Sioux who came off the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, scored one of the biggest upsets in Olympic history when he won the 10,000 meters in 1964.

Just last March, the NCAA Basketball Championships featured Native American standout players including: Bronson Koenig, Derek Willis, Lindy Waters III, Caitlyn Ramirez, and Chelsea Dungee.

Locally,  MorningRose Tobey plays for the University of Nevada Women’s basketball team, while Angelica Shanrock, a 2017 graduate of Spanish Springs High, signed a letter of intent to play colligate ball at College of Skskiyous.

 

All My Relaytions Completes Reno-Tahoe Odyssey Relay Run

Captained by the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony’s Toby Stump,  the 11-member, all Native American team, All My Relaytions completed the 178-mile run that goes around Lake Tahoe, through the Carson Valley, up to Virginia City, and back to the finish line at Idlewild Park in Reno.

In addition to the RSIC Tribal Council, several RSIC departments contributed to sponsoring the team including the Reno-Sparks Tribal Health Center, the RSIC Education and Recreation Department.

Starting from downtown Reno on Friday at 10 a.m., the team crossed the finish line about 3 p.m., on Saturday.

Starting the run, RSIC’s Chandler Sampson, wearing headphones, starts the first leg of the  178-mile Reno Tahoe Odyssey Adventure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Future Spaghetti Bowl Design, Construction Studied; Severe Impact at RSIC Likely

Anyone who has used the Interstate 80/Interstate 580 interchange, or the Spaghetti Bowl, knows that this area is the Achilles’ heel of Reno – Sparks roadways.

Originally constructed between 1969 and 1971 for a metropolitan population of about 130,000 people, the interchange now sees about 118,000 vehicles daily on I-80 just west of the Spaghetti Bowl, while another 102,000 travel U.S. 395 just north of the interchange, according to the Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT).

The Washoe County Consensus Forecast, a written report of projected population, forecasted growth rate exceeding state and national averages though 2030. According to this same report, the population of Washoe County is projected to be 548,159 people in 2036.

The number of collisions at the Spaghetti Bowl nearly doubled in the last five years, growing from 598 crashes in 2011 to 1,060 in 2015.

Additionally, someone was injured in a crash near the interchange almost every day in 2015.

These alarming statics compelled Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval to emphasize, during his 2017 state of state address, the need for safety measures for the interchange.

So, NDOT and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), in cooperation with the Regional Transportation Commission (RTC) will be proposing improvements, specifically to reconstruct the interchange, to accommodate the future travel demands in Washoe County.

According to project’s website, the plan is expected to increase safety and improve operations for both current and future traffic needs.

However, for citizens and community members of the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, this potentially $500 million project which is projected to be designed by 2020 and constructed by 2030, might mean smoother highway traffic patterns, but the reconfiguration of nearby exits might negatively impact the Tribe as well.

“For over 100 years, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony has worked to improve the quality of life for its Tribal members and to develop a self-sufficient economy,” said Chairman Arlan D. Melendez. “Our tribal members rely on the East 2nd street and Glendale avenue interchange to access their homes and to obtain government and health care services.”

Chairman Melendez explained that a closure or change in access to these critical exits / entries could negatively impact the tribal members’ ability to access areas off the reservation for employment and personal needs.

He said that increased traffic would cause a domino effect increasing traffic on Golden lane and Reservation road through established neighborhoods, educational and government facilities.

Moreover, Chairman Melendez noted that regional partners along with the RSIC have spent millions of dollars to redevelop and improve former blighted properties near the current Spaghetti Bowl. These improvements have helped advance local government plans and development goals, and federal policies toward tribes.

“The East 2nd street, Glendale avenue interchange provides critical access for customers visiting Tribal Enterprises and businesses like our smoke shops and Walmart at Three Nations Plaza,” Chairman Melendez said. “Any temporary disruption for businesses during construction activities will negatively impact our tribal government revenues.”

Chairman Melendez said that this construction along with the final design, could have a significant, long-term impact on tribal employment and future employment, which are directly tied to tribal revenues.

However, the planning design, as well as future construction for the Spaghetti Bowl requires compliance with the federal law, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

NEPA requires federal agencies including the FHWA, to assess the environmental effects of a proposed project prior to making decisions. It establishes a framework for environmental review and ensures public and agency participation in the process. Finally, the federal process is intended to help agencies like NDOT and RTC, consider environmental consequences and avoid, minimize, or mitigate environmental impact. The NEPA process for the Spaghetti Bowl project began in March and is expected to continue through May 2020.

Indian Country has great concern as to the environmental impacts to the earth; but the negative social and economic impacts are just as important.

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the range of actions covered by NEPA is broad and includes making decisions on permit applications and constructing highways and other publicly-owned facilities. The possibility of fast-tracking through the NEPA has already been suggested.

In January, a board member for NDOT asked whether the state might escape those intensive environmental studies under an executive order signed by United States President Donald Trump. The board member said that the intent of that order was that all public projects would be exempt from the environmental process.

However, NDOT Director Rudy Malfabon said that he doubts the Spaghetti Bowl could be exempted because of “significant issues with the river and tribal lands…” as Interstate 80 goes over the Truckee River and the freeway passes right next to the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony. Malfabon also told the Northern Nevada Business Weekly that federal money will finance up to 90 percent of the project and bonds should cover the rest.

Malfabon and NDOT Senior Project Manager Nick Johnson outlined seven goals for the improvements which include:

1. Accelerated Delivery: Complete NEPA in 3-and-a-half years or less
2. Long Term Relief: Develop ultimate project to meet 2040 demands
3. Public Support: Secure endorsement from local governments and a favorable opinion from the public
4. Right-of-Way: Minimize displacements
5. Safety: Prioritize project based on eliminating/reducing high accident areas
6. Operations: Create interchange system fully functional and easily navigable within project limits
7. Aesthetics: Enhance the community’s driving experience through visually appealing improvements to the project area