Category Archives: Headlines

2nd Group Inducted into the RSIC Athletics Hall of Fame Induction

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony inducted its 2nd Athletics Hall of Fame class yesterday with a mission not just to honor its past athletes and its culture, but to inspire its current generation of athletes.

With a class of 24 inductees, the RSIC’s 2017 Hall of Fame class is highlighted by its first female athletes—Ramona Darrough, Ivy L, Christy and Lorri Chasing Crow; and two former Golden Glove boxers—cousins Steve and Chuck Sampson.  Steve Sampson boxed during his service as a United States Marine in the late 70s.

The ceremony, held at the Colony Gym, 34 Reservation Rd., started with prayer, a community dinner, honor songs, a keynote speaker and speeches by representatives of the inductees.

Randy Melendez, an assistant in the RSIC Recreation Department, who developed the idea for the Athletics Hall of Fame, gave the keynote.

A retired high school educator who is a member of the Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association Hall of Fame, Melendez was part of the RSIC’s inaugural Hall of Fame Class of 2015.

Furthermore, Melendez who is responsible for most of the historical research, said that the tribe wants to have an Athletics Hall of Fame for three reasons.

“We want to honor our past because these athletes were really remarkable and sports like running and basketball are still a big part of the culture of our community,” said Melendez, a former college athlete.  “Plus, we want to send a message to our youth that these are role models and if today’s athletes work hard, they too, can be anything they want to be.”

Melendez also believes there skills learned through athletics are important like skills, too.

“Sports guided me to my place in the world,” Melendez said.  “From an early age, with support from my family and some very influential coaches, I saw the value and opportunities that athletics could provide me not just to stay close to sports, but ultimately to build a career.”

Among the United States’ 562 federal recognized American Indian tribes, Native Americans are the most under-represented ethnicity on NCAA teams.

“We believe that by honoring our past athletes, our youth will be inspired to strive for their own excellence,” Melendez said.  “My dream came true and I got to be teacher and coach, so I am proof that athletics can lead to a healthy, happy, quality existence.”

Following is a complete listing of the 2017 RSIC Athletics Hall of Fame members:

NAME                  GRAD YEAR         SCHOOL
                               

Sam Uribe                   1948                Stewart Indian School

Dean Paddy                1955                Reno High

Ralph Bryan                1957                Reno High

James Wasson             1968                Pershing County High (Lovelock)

Bob O’Daye                1970                Wooster High

Bucky Sampson          1970                Stewart Indian School

Nelson Aleck              1972                Wooster High

Chuck Sampson          1974                Wooster High

Jonsey Dressler           1973                Wooster High

Steve Sampson            1977                Reed High

Kevin O’Daye             1982                Wooster High

Ralph Sabola               1977                Wooster High    

Ramona Darrough       1982                Pyramid Lake High

Ivy L. Christy              1984                Washoe High

George Moore             1987                Pyramid Lake High

Allan Tobey                1988                Pyramid Lake High

Bennett Nutumya        1988                Pyramid Lake High

Curtis Cypher Jr          1988                Pyramid Lake High

Jody McCloud            1992                Wooster High

Shawn O’Daye           2001                Wooster High

Sonny Malone             2001                Pyramid Lake High

Lori Chasing Crow     2002                Pyramid Lake High

Kyle Coffman             2004                Pyramid Lake High

Lyndsey Rivers           2004                Pyramid Lake High

 

Some of the 24 people inducted into the 2017 RSIC Athletics Hall of Fame.

Tribal Health Center Doctor Gets Emergency Duty Call

In response to recent hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, 58 United States Public Health Service officers including the Reno-Sparks Tribal Health Center provider Dr. Tara Van Orden, were deployed and continue to assist victims from three of the worst weather events in history.

“A day did not go by without someone asking about her,” said Andrea Johnson-Harper.  “We are so very proud of her.”

Dr. Tara Van Orden

In mid-September, Van Orden initially reported to Houston and was eventually sent to help at a shelter in Fort Myers, Fla.  She just returned this week from assisting hurricane victims in Puerto Rico.

Dr. Van Orden and other health service officers form Disaster Medical Assistance Teams which are professional and para-professional medical personnel organized to provide rapid-response medical care or casualty decontamination during a terrorist attack, natural disaster, or other incidents in the United States.

“It was stressful leaving the health center, especially my patients, but I knew the people impacted by the hurricanes needed help,” Van Orden said in between her assignment.

The three hurricanes caused record levels of rainfall and flooding which affected millions of people in Texas, Louisiana, Florida, and Latin America.

During hurricanes, high winds cause water surges, flooding and are often followed by additional damaging winds and rainfall.

“We actually were onsite when Hurricane Irma hit Florida,” Dr. Van Orden said.  “Typically, we arrive after a disaster, but in this case, we sheltered in place in a high school building just like thousands of others.“

The Indian Health Service (IHS) United States Public Health Service Officers work to assess the needs of local service units, tribes and tribal organizations to assist with health care and medical needs for those impacted by the storms.

The deployed officers represented 11 of the 12 IHS area offices.

The Public Health Service officers provided support with efforts such as delivering pharmaceutical supplies, assisting those who rely upon electricity-dependent medical equipment like wheelchairs, oxygen tanks and blood sugar monitors; evacuating hospital patients; and staffing Federal Medical Stations.

In the aftermath of the storms, a group of 36 mental health team members continued to provide emergency support in the form of direct clinical, behavioral and mental health services, including individual and family crisis intervention, staff and workforce protection counseling, emergency on-call service and disaster case management.

Hurricane Irma impacted the Seminole Tribe of Florida, Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida, Catawba in South Carolina, Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama, Eastern Cherokee in North Carolina and the Pamunkey Tribe in Virginia, though Van Orden’s assignments have not been in Indian Country.

The IHS preparations include taking protective measures, assuring food, fuel, water and ice with contingency plans, and establishing points of distribution.

According to an official press release distributed by IHS, the agency takes great pride in providing help to tribal nations and to all members of the public who have been affected by the recent hurricanes.

And there’s no doubt that pride extends right back to the RSTHC.

Editor’s Note:
Much of this article was provided by Leonda Levchuk, IHS Public Affairs Specialist, whose agency granted permission to the RSIC to reproduce her work.

 

October at the RSIC

According to time&date.com, in ancient times, it was common to track the changing seasons by following and measuring the moon’s revolution or a lunar month rather than the solar year.

For millennia, Native American tribes named the months after features they associated with the Northern Hemisphere seasons, and many of these names are very similar or identical.

This year, the Old Farmer’s Almanac says that the Oct. 5 Full Moon, will also be a Harvest Moon because it is the full moon closest to the Northern Hemisphere’s autumnal equinox.

Around the Harvest Moon, the moonrise happens soon after sunset for several evenings in a row, which traditionally allowed farmers to have much more light to finish their harvest.

The birthstone for October is the opal and it is said that the opal will crack if it is worn by someone who was not born in October.

2 MONDAY
Senior Advisory Committee meeting, Senior Center, 10 a.m.
Education Advisory Committee meeting, Education Conference Room, Noon
Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Enrollment Advisory Committee meeting, Enrollment Office, 5:30 p.m.
Honoring the Gift of Heart Health, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.
3 TUESDAY
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Drug Endangered Children Information Evening, 34 Reservation Rd., 5:30 p.m.
4 WEDNESDAY
Cardio Kickboxing, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Spinning With Michelle, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Law & Order Committee, Tribal Court, 6 p.m.
5 THURSDAY
Elder Hot Springs, Carson Hot Spring, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Cardio Kickboxing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Zombie Paintball, Andelin Farm, 6 p.m.
6 FRIDAY
Native Art Classes, RSTHC Behavioral Health, 9 a.m.
Tai Chi with Christian, 3NWC, Noon
Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Spartan Training, 3NWC, 5 p.m.
9 MONDAY
Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Honoring the Gift of Heart Health, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.
10 TUESDAY
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Chair Volleyball, Reno Gym, 10 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
11 WEDNESDAY
Operation Take Your Best Shot, RSTHC, 1 p.m.
Cardio Kickboxing, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Spinning With Michelle, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Tribal Council Meeting, Hungry Valley Rec Center., 6 p.m.
12 THURSDAY
Elder Hot Springs, Carson Hot Spring, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Cardio Kickboxing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
13 FRIDAY
Native Art Classes, RSTHC Behavioral Health, 9 a.m.
Fall Fest Craft Fair, RSIC Gym, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Tai Chi with Christian, 3NWC, Noon
Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Spartan Training, 3NWC, 5 p.m.
14 SATURDAY
Family Health Fair, Anderson Park, 10 a.m.
Fall Fest Craft Fair, RSIC Gym, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
15 SUNDAY
Name, Address Changes Due for Christmas Distribution, Enrollment Dept.
16 MONDAY
Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Executive Health Board meeting, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.
Honoring the Gift of Heart Health, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.
17 TUESDAY
Commodity Distribution, Senior Center, 8 a.m.
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Candidates Night, 34 Multipurpose Room, 6 p.m.
18 WEDNESDAY
Free Mammograms, RSTHC Parking Lot, 8 a.m.
Balancing Your Life & Diabetes Group Education, RSTHC, 12:10 p.m.
Cardio Kickboxing, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Pumpkin Patch, Andelin Farm, 5-7:3 p.m.
Spinning With Michelle, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
19 THURSDAY
Elder Hot Springs, Carson Hot Spring, 9 a.m.
Hungry Valley Head Start Halloween Parade, 10 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Cardio Kickboxing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Candidates Night, Hungry Valley Recreation Center, 6 p.m.
20 FRIDAY
Native Art Classes, RSTHC Behavioral Health, 9 a.m.
Tai Chi with Christian, 3NWC, Noon
Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Spartan Training, 3NWC, 5 p.m.
23 MONDAY
Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Honoring the Gift of Heart Health, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.
Housing Advisory Board Meeting, Hungry Valley Recreation Center, 6 p.m.
24 TUESDAY
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Halloween Community Celebration, Hungry Valley
25 WEDNESDAY
Reno Head Start Halloween Parade, 10 a.m.
Balancing Your Life & Diabetes Group Education, RSTHC, 12:10 p.m.
Cardio Kickboxing, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Spinning With Michelle, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Economic Development Meeting, Hungry Valley Rec Center, 6 p.m.
26 THURSDAY
Elder Hot Springs, Carson Hot Spring, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Cardio Kickboxing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Halloween Community Celebration, Reno
27 FRIDAY
Nevada Day, RSIC Administration Offices Closed
28 SATURDAY
Nevada Day Parade, Carson City, 10 a.m.
30 MONDAY
Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Honoring the Gift of Heart Health, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.
31 TUESDAY
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Chair-Based Yoga, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.

Update: Electricity Outage in Hungry Valley

Reno, Nev. (updated 7 a.m.) After least 150 households on the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony’s Hungry Valley land base went without electricity, most likely do to a storm, power was restored to some homes at 1:51 a.m., while others were dark until 7 a.m. on Wednesday.

RSIC staff including the recreation department, emergency responders—fire and police; extended the hours of operation at the Hungry Valley Recreation Center until 11:15 p.m., as about 45 people used the facility as an emergency shelter.

Community members impacted by the power outage were fed at the complex. The shelter operation was terminated at 11:15 p.m.

Below are safety tips for dealing with a power outage:

  • Only use flashlights for emergency lighting, candles can cause fires.
  • Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed. Most food requiring refrigeration can be kept safely in a closed refrigerator for several hours. An unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4 hours.
    A full freezer will keep the temperature for about 48 hours.
  • Take steps to remain cool if it is hot outside. In intense heat when the power may be off for a long time, consider going to a movie theater, shopping mall or “cooling shelter” that may be open in your community.
  • Turn off or disconnect appliances and other equipment in case of a momentary power “surge” that can damage computers and other devices. Consider adding surge protectors.
  • If you are considering purchasing a generator for your home, consult an electrician or engineer before purchasing and installing.
  • Only use generators away from your home and NEVER run a generator inside a home or garage, or connect it to your home’s electrical system.

Colony to Allow Passive Recreation in Hungry Valley

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Tribal Council will allow certain uses by the public of the 13,343 acres the tribe recently reacquired under the Nevada Native Nations Land Act.

Allowed & Prohibited Use Hungry Valley Map

With a priority on better land management, the RSIC Tribal Council passed a resolution which allows for nondestructive, peaceful uses of the lands such as hiking, bicycling, horseback riding, day parking of vehicles in designated areas, geocaching, and cross country running, without the need of a permit.

“We want to establish good relationships with the whole community,” said Chairman Arlan D. Melendez. “Though we expected a longer time frame to transition the management of the land with the Bureau of Land Management, our goal is to inform and work closely with our neighbors as we manage our land in Hungry Valley.”

In addition, the RSIC leadership restated unacceptable activity on the land including: dumping, target shooting, random discharge of firearms, hunting, camping without a permit, camp fires and other fires, use of fireworks, disturbance of cultural sites, or use of alcohol.

Furthermore, the Colony will allow all-terrain vehicles (e.g., quads, utility terrain vehicles or motorcycles) only to pass through the land on a designated route to outside use areas, and for the period ending Dec. 31, 2017, will allow these all-terrain vehicles on certain established trails within a designated areas in the Hungry Valley addition adjacent to Spanish Springs.

A map with those designated areas will be posted soon on the RSIC website: www.rsic.org and at the existing kiosks on those lands.

We appreciate the patience and understanding of the general public as we take necessary steps to allow the land to recover and heal due to overuse from multiple activities,” Melendez said. “We have identified a number of priorities and our staff will be working on these so we can better manage our land.”

This management plan includes designating emergency access and evacuations routes,

completing an exterior boundary survey in coordination with BLM, installing information
signage, inventory of environmental and cultural resources, and development of a
transportation plan.All uses will be considered again by the Tribal Council before Dec. 31, 2017.“Our resolution allows us to monitor the land usage, reevaluate and modify or extend this policy,” Chairman Melendez said.

National Museum of the American Indian Director Visits Reno-Sparks Indian Colony

The Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) has been charged by Congress with building a National Native American Veterans Memorial, and on Monday, veterans and had a chance to comment on the pending design and construction.

Native Americans have served in the United States military in every major conflict since the Revolutionary War. In recent decades, they have served in greater numbers per capita than any other ethnic group.

So, the museum has begun preliminary plans to construct this memorial in the next four years to give all Americans the opportunity to learn of the proud and courageous tradition of service of Native Americans in the Armed Forces of the United States.

The NMAI and the advisory committee are currently conducting consultations to share plans for the memorial and to seek input and support. Regional events, like the one being held at the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony (RSIC), bring together tribal leaders, Native veterans, and community members.

RSIC Tribal Chairman Arlan D. Melendez, a Marine Corps veteran, co-hosted a consultation for the memorial at the Reno-Sparks Tribal Health Care Center on May 1.  Veterans, their family members, professionals whom work with veterans and members of the community attended.
The service and sacrifice of Native American veterans, including American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians, spans nearly two and a half centuries of American history. During World War II, over 44,000 Native Americans served in the U.S. military. Hundreds of Hopi, Navajo, Comanche, and other Native language speakers—Code Talkers—played a crucial role. More than 42,000 Native Americans served during the Vietnam War.

Today, the U.S. Department of Defense estimates more than 24,000 American Indian and Alaska Native men and women are on active duty, and more than 150,000 veterans self-identify as American Indian or Alaska Native.

An advisory committee for the memorial has been formed, led by the Honorable Ben Nighthorse Campbell (Northern Cheyenne) and Chickasaw Nation Lieutenant Governor Jefferson Keel. The group, composed of tribal leaders and veterans from across Native America, is assisting with outreach to communities and veterans and advising on plans for the memorial.

In the fall of 2020, the museum will launch a juried competition to select a design for the memorial. The National Native American Veterans Memorial will be located prominently on the museum’s grounds on the National Mall, between the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum and the U.S. Capitol. The dedication ceremony is planned for Veterans Day 2020, to unveil the memorial and honor the immense contributions and patriotism of Native Americans in the U.S. Armed Forces.

Nominations to Serve on Secretarial Election Board Needed

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Tribal Council is soliciting nominations of Colony members to fill three positions on the Secretarial Election Board. The Board consists of a Chairman (most likely Robert “RJ” Eben, the BIA Western Nevada Agency Superintendent), two BIA personnel, and three Colony members.

This Election Board is separate from the RSIC Election Board. The Board will only be active if the Tribal Council makes a formal request to the BIA to hold a Secretarial Election.

The Secretarial Election Board’s main functions include deciding appeals on whether someone is eligible to be a registered voter for this election and deciding challenges to the election results, and several pre-election actions such as establishing deadlines and posting election results, and may include assisting the BIA with sending correspondence to members.

Minimum qualifications for these positions are that the individual must be an enrolled Colony member at least 18 years of age.

If you, or someone you know, are interested in serving on this Election Board, please send a written request to Arlan D. Melendez, Chairman of RSIC no later than April 25, 2017. The three individuals to fill these positions will be selected by the Tribal Council.

New Hungry Valley Borders

In accordance with the Nevada Native Nations Land Act, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Tribal Council, along with Tribal Police and Hungry Valley Fire departments wish to remind all community members that the RSIC now has jurisdiction of the 15,354 acres in the Valley.

If you see or hear illegal activities—shooting, dumping, alcohol use, or off-road vehicle activity outside designated routes and areas, please call the tribal police at 323-2677 or 240-9775.

Allowed & Prohibited Use Map
Nevada Native Nations Act – Public Law-114publ232




 

 

Tribal Member Opens Alluring Beauty

For years, Johni Bill has wanted to help people with an issue she encountered as a teen—skin health. Now, as the owner/operator of Alluring Beauty, Bill is not just providing aesthetician services, but she is a role model for other budding entrepreneurs.

“I’m still learning, but I am really excited,” Bill said. “Becoming a business owner is a big step for me.”

Her business, located at 1962 Pyramid Hwy, in a shared space with the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony’s Smoke Shop V, focuses on waxing, tinting and eyelash extensions and Bill plans to offer facials soon.

Since high school when Bill herself dealt with problem skin, she has explored the field of cosmetology and has had an interest in being a hair and makeup artist.

It was this ambition which led her to a Jan. 30 grand opening of her open salon.

“Johni had a vision and has stepped forward to be one of our small business pioneers,” Chairman Arlan D. Melendez told the crowd of about 20 which gathered for the celebration. “When you really think about self-determination, a term that we talk about a lot in Indian Country, Johni is showing us a real example.”

Bill said that she does feel a little pressure, but she is excited to show other people that operating a business is a worthy, attainable goal for anyone at the RSIC willing to work hard.

“There are a lot of laws and rules, and that is a good thing,” Bill said. “Creating a business plan and a safety manual took a lot.”

According to Steve Moran, the director of the RSIC Economic Development and Business Enterprises Department, one of the goals of the RSIC Tribal Council is to offer more help to tribal members who want to go into business for him/herself.

In addition to providing information about local resources which can help an entrepreneur secure funding, write a business plan, file for a business license, and the like, the Colony has partnered with other agencies to hold workshops to assist small business owners.

In the case of Alluring Beauty, the RSIC’s operation of a business incubator—retail space for multiple users-—allows the tribe to offer low start up costs to help Bill get her business started.

Chairman Melendez said that because Bill has the tenacity to be independent and not totally dependent on the tribe, she is fulfilling an important role for the entire community.

“We recognize that we need more small businesses,” Melendez said. “That will take leaders in our community and we congratulate and thank Johni for taking on that responsibility.”

Alluring Beauty is open Tuesday-Sunday from 10 a.m., until 7 p.m. Bill can be reached at 775/722-4880.

Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Tribal member Johni Bill celebrated the grand opening of her new business located at 1962 Pyramid Hwy, Suite B, next to Smoke Shop V. Specializing in aesthetician services like waxing, tinting and eyelash extensions, call 722-4880 for an appointment.