Public Comment Sought for Proposed Amendments

A year ago, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Tribal Council approved the formation of a Constitution Revision Work Group to consider possible amendments to the RSIC Constitution.

The Work Group has held 10 meetings since that time to solicit input from the membership. While those discussions raised many issues that could be addressed by an amendment, the Work Group process narrowed the list of proposed amendments to a manageable one-half dozen areas.

The currently proposed amendments are linked and appear below.

The first column contains the current Constitution provision, if any, and the middle column contains the proposed amendment, and the third column contains an explanation and room for you to note your comments.

Comments at the meetings will be recorded. Each member may take up to 3 minutes to comment on the proposed amendments.

If a member is unable to attend the meetings, he/she may submit written comments to the Chairman’s office.  Written comments must be legibly signed by that member.

After discussion on proposed amendments by the membership, the language of the attached proposed amendments may be revised, or new amendments may be added, or amendments may be dropped, by decision of the Tribal Council. The Tribal Council most likely will finalize the proposed amendments, and adopt a Resolution for the BIA to conduct a Secretarial Election, at its April 26 Economic Development meeting in Hungry Valley or at a special meeting to be called for that purpose.

It is contemplated that the Secretarial Election will be held in late July (within 90 days after the BIA receives the tribe’s request for the election).

Since this is a “Secretarial Election” (a federally administered election conducted according to federal regulations) as required by the RSIC Constitution, Colony members must register to vote with the BIA for this election.

Registration with the BIA for a previous election is not valid for this election. If a member does not register with the BIA for this election, he/she will not receive the voting packet.

The BIA will be responsible for mailing you a registration form and mail ballot, etc., after the Colony requests the Secretarial Election.

The RSIC Constitution, and federal law, require a majority vote by at least 30 percent of its qualified voters to adopt any amendments to the Constitution, so it is important to register.

Voting will be by mail ballots sent to you by the BIA, so it is important to make sure the Enrollment Office has your current address which will be provided to the BIA.

Double click link below for informational PDFs:
Selected Amendments Comparison to 2011 Constitution March 20 (4)
Additional proposals with comparison April 3

Double click on the images below to enlarge:


 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tribal Member Brandy Shaw Takes First Place in Student Art Contest

Truckee Meadows Community College (TMCC) announced recently that Brandy Shaw earned first place at the 43rd Annual Student Art & Design Exhibition for her painting called “Lost Bear.”

A member of the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony and a sophomore fine arts major at TMCC, Shaw said that through her art, she wants to teach others, Native and non-Native, about tribalism and to inspire others.

Shaw painted “Lost Bear,” on an 8’x4’ panel board for a class assignment, and then entered the painting into the contest.

“The Paiute/Sioux designs in the piece are my sister Kelly, and the rest of my family,” Shaw said. “They are my inspiration.”

The public can view Shaw’s painting at the TMCC Main Art Gallery in the Red Mountain Building Student Center on the Dandini Campus. The gallery is open from on weekdays, 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Currently, “Lost Bear” is part of the TMCC permanent collection and will eventually be moved over to the Edison Site according to Candace Garlock, the art galleries curator.

 

 

 

Future Spaghetti Bowl Design, Construction Studied; Severe Impact at RSIC Likely

Anyone who has used the Interstate 80/Interstate 580 interchange, or the Spaghetti Bowl, knows that this area is the Achilles’ heel of Reno – Sparks roadways.

Originally constructed between 1969 and 1971 for a metropolitan population of about 130,000 people, the interchange now sees about 118,000 vehicles daily on I-80 just west of the Spaghetti Bowl, while another 102,000 travel U.S. 395 just north of the interchange, according to the Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT).

The Washoe County Consensus Forecast, a written report of projected population, forecasted growth rate exceeding state and national averages though 2030. According to this same report, the population of Washoe County is projected to be 548,159 people in 2036.

The number of collisions at the Spaghetti Bowl nearly doubled in the last five years, growing from 598 crashes in 2011 to 1,060 in 2015.

Additionally, someone was injured in a crash near the interchange almost every day in 2015.

These alarming statics compelled Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval to emphasize, during his 2017 state of state address, the need for safety measures for the interchange.

So, NDOT and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), in cooperation with the Regional Transportation Commission (RTC) will be proposing improvements, specifically to reconstruct the interchange, to accommodate the future travel demands in Washoe County.

According to project’s website, the plan is expected to increase safety and improve operations for both current and future traffic needs.

However, for citizens and community members of the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, this potentially $500 million project which is projected to be designed by 2020 and constructed by 2030, might mean smoother highway traffic patterns, but the reconfiguration of nearby exits might negatively impact the Tribe as well.

“For over 100 years, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony has worked to improve the quality of life for its Tribal members and to develop a self-sufficient economy,” said Chairman Arlan D. Melendez. “Our tribal members rely on the East 2nd street and Glendale avenue interchange to access their homes and to obtain government and health care services.”

Chairman Melendez explained that a closure or change in access to these critical exits / entries could negatively impact the tribal members’ ability to access areas off the reservation for employment and personal needs.

He said that increased traffic would cause a domino effect increasing traffic on Golden lane and Reservation road through established neighborhoods, educational and government facilities.

Moreover, Chairman Melendez noted that regional partners along with the RSIC have spent millions of dollars to redevelop and improve former blighted properties near the current Spaghetti Bowl. These improvements have helped advance local government plans and development goals, and federal policies toward tribes.

“The East 2nd street, Glendale avenue interchange provides critical access for customers visiting Tribal Enterprises and businesses like our smoke shops and Walmart at Three Nations Plaza,” Chairman Melendez said. “Any temporary disruption for businesses during construction activities will negatively impact our tribal government revenues.”

Chairman Melendez said that this construction along with the final design, could have a significant, long-term impact on tribal employment and future employment, which are directly tied to tribal revenues.

However, the planning design, as well as future construction for the Spaghetti Bowl requires compliance with the federal law, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

NEPA requires federal agencies including the FHWA, to assess the environmental effects of a proposed project prior to making decisions. It establishes a framework for environmental review and ensures public and agency participation in the process. Finally, the federal process is intended to help agencies like NDOT and RTC, consider environmental consequences and avoid, minimize, or mitigate environmental impact. The NEPA process for the Spaghetti Bowl project began in March and is expected to continue through May 2020.

Indian Country has great concern as to the environmental impacts to the earth; but the negative social and economic impacts are just as important.

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the range of actions covered by NEPA is broad and includes making decisions on permit applications and constructing highways and other publicly-owned facilities. The possibility of fast-tracking through the NEPA has already been suggested.

In January, a board member for NDOT asked whether the state might escape those intensive environmental studies under an executive order signed by United States President Donald Trump. The board member said that the intent of that order was that all public projects would be exempt from the environmental process.

However, NDOT Director Rudy Malfabon said that he doubts the Spaghetti Bowl could be exempted because of “significant issues with the river and tribal lands…” as Interstate 80 goes over the Truckee River and the freeway passes right next to the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony. Malfabon also told the Northern Nevada Business Weekly that federal money will finance up to 90 percent of the project and bonds should cover the rest.

Malfabon and NDOT Senior Project Manager Nick Johnson outlined seven goals for the improvements which include:

1. Accelerated Delivery: Complete NEPA in 3-and-a-half years or less
2. Long Term Relief: Develop ultimate project to meet 2040 demands
3. Public Support: Secure endorsement from local governments and a favorable opinion from the public
4. Right-of-Way: Minimize displacements
5. Safety: Prioritize project based on eliminating/reducing high accident areas
6. Operations: Create interchange system fully functional and easily navigable within project limits
7. Aesthetics: Enhance the community’s driving experience through visually appealing improvements to the project area

 

 

May at the RSIC

MONDAY 1
Native American Veterans Town Hall-National American Indian Museum, RSTHC, 10 a.m.
Education Advisory Committee meeting, Education Conference Room, Noon
Senior Advisory Committee meeting, Senior Center, 1 p.m.
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 3 p.m.
Enrollment Advisory Committee meeting, Enrollment Office, 5:30 p.m.
Zumba, Reno Gym, 6 p.m.

TUESDAY 2
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 3:30 p.m.
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 5 p.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY 3
Adult Kickboxing, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Elder Fit Class, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Prevent T2 Diabetes Class, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Zumba, Reno Gym, 6 p.m.
Law & Order Committee Meeting, Tribal Court, 6 p.m.

THURSDAY 4
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 3:30 p.m.
Great Basin Native Artist Opening, Gorman Museum, Davis, Calif., 4 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.

FRIDAY 5
Native Art Classes, Behavioral Health Division, 9 a.m.

SATURDAY 6
Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful Great American Cleanup, Eagle Canyon Road, 8 a.m.
University of Nevada Pow Wow, Intramural Field, Grand Entry, Noon & 7 p.m.

SUNDAY 7
University of Nevada Pow Wow, Intramural Field, Grand Entry, Noon

MONDAY 8
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 3 p.m. Zumba, Reno Gym, 6 p.m.

TUESDAY 9
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 3:30 p.m.
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 5 p.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY 10
Adult Kickboxing, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Elder Fit Class, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Prevent T2 Diabetes Class, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.
Zumba, Reno Gym, 6 p.m.

THURSDAY 11  
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Zulily Job Fair, 34 Multi-Purpose Room, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 3:30 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.

FRIDAY 12
Native Art Classes, Behavioral Health Division, 9 a.m.
2nd Annual Tamano Craft Fair, Reno Gym, 10 a.m.
Mother’s Day Raffle, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.

SATURDAY 13
2nd Annual Tamano Craft Fair, Reno Gym, 10 a.m.

SUNDAY 14
Mother’s Day Bingo, Hungry Valley Rec Center, Noon

MONDAY 15
Native Wellness Talking Circle, Tribal Court Building, 1 p.m.
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 3 p.m.
Executive Health Board meeting, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.
Zumba, Reno Gym, 6 p.m.

TUESDAY 16
Commodity Distribution, Senior Center, 8 a.m.
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 3:30 p.m.
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 5 p.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY 17
Adult Kickboxing, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Elder Fit Class, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Prevent T2 Diabetes Class, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.
Zumba, Reno Gym, 6 p.m.
Tribal Council Meeting, 34 Reservation Road, 6 p.m.

THURSDAY 18
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Job Fair, 34 Multi-Purpose Room, 10 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 3:30 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.

FRIDAY 19
Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Cleanup, Anderson Park, 8 a.m.
Native Art Classes, Behavioral Health Division, 9 a.m.

SATURDAY 20
Hungry Valley Head Start Transition Ceremony, Hungry Valley Rec Center, 10 a.m.

MONDAY 22
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 3 p.m.
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Zumba, Reno Gym, 6 p.m.
Housing Advisory Board Meeting, Housing Office, 6 p.m.
Baby Moccasin Making Class, Hungry Valley Rec, 6 p.m.

TUESDAY 23
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 3:30 p.m.
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 5 p.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY 24
Adult Kickboxing, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Elder Fit Class, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2 p.m.
Elementary After-School Tutoring, Downtown Colony & Hungry Valley Ed Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Archives & Records Open House and Meet & Greet, 15A Reservation Rd., 4 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Prevent T2 Diabetes Class, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.
Zumba, Reno Gym, 6 p.m.

THURSDAY 25
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
FINAL Middle & High School After-School Tutoring, Education Offices, 2 p.m.
FINAL Elementary After-School Tutoring, Education Offices, 2:30 p.m.
Talking Circle, RSTHC Behavioral Health Division, 4 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Reno Head Start Transition Ceremony, 34 Multipurpose Room, 6 p.m.

FRIDAY 26
Last Day of Head Start Native Art Classes, Behavioral Health Division, 9 a.m.
Picaso for Mom, Reno Gym, 6 p.m.

MONDAY 29
Memorial Day, RSIC Offices Closed
RSIC Veterans Remembrance, Mountain View Cemetery, 9 am.
RSIC Veterans Remembrance, Hungry Valley Cemetery, 11 am.

TUESDAY 30
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 5 p.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Baby Moccasin Making Class, Hungry Valley Rec, 6 p.m.

WEDNESDAY 31
Adult Kickboxing, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Elder Fit Class, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Prevent T2 Diabetes Class, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m. Zumba, Reno Gym, 6 p.m.
Economic Development Meeting, 34 Reservation Road, 6 p.m.

National Museum of the American Indian Director Visits Reno-Sparks Indian Colony

The Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) has been charged by Congress with building a National Native American Veterans Memorial, and on Monday, veterans and had a chance to comment on the pending design and construction.

Native Americans have served in the United States military in every major conflict since the Revolutionary War. In recent decades, they have served in greater numbers per capita than any other ethnic group.

So, the museum has begun preliminary plans to construct this memorial in the next four years to give all Americans the opportunity to learn of the proud and courageous tradition of service of Native Americans in the Armed Forces of the United States.

The NMAI and the advisory committee are currently conducting consultations to share plans for the memorial and to seek input and support. Regional events, like the one being held at the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony (RSIC), bring together tribal leaders, Native veterans, and community members.

RSIC Tribal Chairman Arlan D. Melendez, a Marine Corps veteran, co-hosted a consultation for the memorial at the Reno-Sparks Tribal Health Care Center on May 1.  Veterans, their family members, professionals whom work with veterans and members of the community attended.
The service and sacrifice of Native American veterans, including American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians, spans nearly two and a half centuries of American history. During World War II, over 44,000 Native Americans served in the U.S. military. Hundreds of Hopi, Navajo, Comanche, and other Native language speakers—Code Talkers—played a crucial role. More than 42,000 Native Americans served during the Vietnam War.

Today, the U.S. Department of Defense estimates more than 24,000 American Indian and Alaska Native men and women are on active duty, and more than 150,000 veterans self-identify as American Indian or Alaska Native.

An advisory committee for the memorial has been formed, led by the Honorable Ben Nighthorse Campbell (Northern Cheyenne) and Chickasaw Nation Lieutenant Governor Jefferson Keel. The group, composed of tribal leaders and veterans from across Native America, is assisting with outreach to communities and veterans and advising on plans for the memorial.

In the fall of 2020, the museum will launch a juried competition to select a design for the memorial. The National Native American Veterans Memorial will be located prominently on the museum’s grounds on the National Mall, between the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum and the U.S. Capitol. The dedication ceremony is planned for Veterans Day 2020, to unveil the memorial and honor the immense contributions and patriotism of Native Americans in the U.S. Armed Forces.

Colony to Allow Passive Recreation in Hungry Valley

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Tribal Council will allow certain uses by the public of the 13,343 acres the tribe recently reacquired under the Nevada Native Nations Land Act.

Allowed & Prohibited Use Hungry Valley Map

With a priority on better land management, the RSIC Tribal Council passed a resolution which allows for nondestructive, peaceful uses of the lands such as hiking, bicycling, horseback riding, day parking of vehicles in designated areas, geocaching, and cross country running, without the need of a permit.

“We want to establish good relationships with the whole community,” said Chairman Arlan D. Melendez. “Though we expected a longer time frame to transition the management of the land with the Bureau of Land Management, our goal is to inform and work closely with our neighbors as we manage our land in Hungry Valley.”

In addition, the RSIC leadership restated unacceptable activity on the land including: dumping, target shooting, random discharge of firearms, hunting, camping without a permit, camp fires and other fires, use of fireworks, disturbance of cultural sites, or use of alcohol.

Furthermore, the Colony will allow all-terrain vehicles (e.g., quads, utility terrain vehicles or motorcycles) only to pass through the land on a designated route to outside use areas, and for the period ending Dec. 31, 2017, will allow these all-terrain vehicles on certain established trails within a designated areas in the Hungry Valley addition adjacent to Spanish Springs.

A map with those designated areas will be posted soon on the RSIC website: www.rsic.org and at the existing kiosks on those lands.

We appreciate the patience and understanding of the general public as we take necessary steps to allow the land to recover and heal due to overuse from multiple activities,” Melendez said. “We have identified a number of priorities and our staff will be working on these so we can better manage our land.”

This management plan includes designating emergency access and evacuations routes,

completing an exterior boundary survey in coordination with BLM, installing information
signage, inventory of environmental and cultural resources, and development of a
transportation plan.All uses will be considered again by the Tribal Council before Dec. 31, 2017.“Our resolution allows us to monitor the land usage, reevaluate and modify or extend this policy,” Chairman Melendez said.


Nominations to Serve on Secretarial Election Board Needed

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Tribal Council is soliciting nominations of Colony members to fill three positions on the Secretarial Election Board. The Board consists of a Chairman (most likely Robert “RJ” Eben, the BIA Western Nevada Agency Superintendent), two BIA personnel, and three Colony members.

This Election Board is separate from the RSIC Election Board. The Board will only be active if the Tribal Council makes a formal request to the BIA to hold a Secretarial Election.

The Secretarial Election Board’s main functions include deciding appeals on whether someone is eligible to be a registered voter for this election and deciding challenges to the election results, and several pre-election actions such as establishing deadlines and posting election results, and may include assisting the BIA with sending correspondence to members.

Minimum qualifications for these positions are that the individual must be an enrolled Colony member at least 18 years of age.

If you, or someone you know, are interested in serving on this Election Board, please send a written request to Arlan D. Melendez, Chairman of RSIC no later than April 25, 2017. The three individuals to fill these positions will be selected by the Tribal Council.

New Hungry Valley Borders

In accordance with the Nevada Native Nations Land Act, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Tribal Council, along with Tribal Police and Hungry Valley Fire departments wish to remind all community members that the RSIC now has jurisdiction of the 15,354 acres in the Valley.

If you see or hear illegal activities—shooting, dumping, alcohol use, or off-road vehicle activity outside designated routes and areas, please call the tribal police at 323-2677 or 240-9775.

Allowed & Prohibited Use Map
Nevada Native Nations Act – Public Law-114publ232




 

 

Tribal Member Opens Alluring Beauty

For years, Johni Bill has wanted to help people with an issue she encountered as a teen—skin health. Now, as the owner/operator of Alluring Beauty, Bill is not just providing aesthetician services, but she is a role model for other budding entrepreneurs.

“I’m still learning, but I am really excited,” Bill said. “Becoming a business owner is a big step for me.”

Her business, located at 1962 Pyramid Hwy, in a shared space with the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony’s Smoke Shop V, focuses on waxing, tinting and eyelash extensions and Bill plans to offer facials soon.

Since high school when Bill herself dealt with problem skin, she has explored the field of cosmetology and has had an interest in being a hair and makeup artist.

It was this ambition which led her to a Jan. 30 grand opening of her open salon.

“Johni had a vision and has stepped forward to be one of our small business pioneers,” Chairman Arlan D. Melendez told the crowd of about 20 which gathered for the celebration. “When you really think about self-determination, a term that we talk about a lot in Indian Country, Johni is showing us a real example.”

Bill said that she does feel a little pressure, but she is excited to show other people that operating a business is a worthy, attainable goal for anyone at the RSIC willing to work hard.

“There are a lot of laws and rules, and that is a good thing,” Bill said. “Creating a business plan and a safety manual took a lot.”

According to Steve Moran, the director of the RSIC Economic Development and Business Enterprises Department, one of the goals of the RSIC Tribal Council is to offer more help to tribal members who want to go into business for him/herself.

In addition to providing information about local resources which can help an entrepreneur secure funding, write a business plan, file for a business license, and the like, the Colony has partnered with other agencies to hold workshops to assist small business owners.

In the case of Alluring Beauty, the RSIC’s operation of a business incubator—retail space for multiple users-—allows the tribe to offer low start up costs to help Bill get her business started.

Chairman Melendez said that because Bill has the tenacity to be independent and not totally dependent on the tribe, she is fulfilling an important role for the entire community.

“We recognize that we need more small businesses,” Melendez said. “That will take leaders in our community and we congratulate and thank Johni for taking on that responsibility.”

Alluring Beauty is open Tuesday-Sunday from 10 a.m., until 7 p.m. Bill can be reached at 775/722-4880.

Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Tribal member Johni Bill celebrated the grand opening of her new business located at 1962 Pyramid Hwy, Suite B, next to Smoke Shop V. Specializing in aesthetician services like waxing, tinting and eyelash extensions, call 722-4880 for an appointment.

 

Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Gives Nearly $500,000 to Washoe Schools

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony (RSIC) commemorated its first revenue sharing payment to the Washoe County School District with a ceremonial “big check” handover today at the Colony’s health center.

“We are proud to publicly reinforce our commitment to educating all Washoe County school children,” said Arlan D. Melendez, Chairman of the RSIC. “Our leadership is committed to the academic advancement of not just our Native American students, but to all area youth.”

This nearly half-a-million-dollar contribution is the final step in a 15-year-project between Washoe County, the State of Nevada and the RSIC.

“This collaboration was designed to benefit all parties, most importantly our children,” Chairman Melendez said. “Thanks to the success of our retail operations with our increased tax revenue, the entire region is enjoying new community amenities, increased urban development, private partnerships and of course, revenue sharing for education.”

In accordance with Assembly Bill 299 which unanimously passed the Nevada Legislature in 2005, the RSIC proposed to share sales tax revenue from its retail project near Highway 395 and East Second Street to benefit the Washoe County School District. Using tribal tax revenues and a 1995 tribal municipal bond, the Colony purchased multiple properties and amassed 22-acres just east of its downtown land base. However, because the properties had been the site of several industrial businesses, the RSIC partnered with the Environmental Protection Agency and the Nevada Division of Environment Protection, to remove soil contaminated with pesticides, petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), lead, and nitrogen.

After the environmental cleanup, the RSIC worked with the Washoe County Flood Control Project, the Washoe County Public Works Department, the Nevada Departments of State Lands, the Army Corps of Engineers, and Wal-Mart to construct a quarter-mile floodwall and levee along the south bank of the Truckee River between 1-580 and the Glendale bridge.

Furthermore, the Colony also worked with the Nevada Division of Public Works to design and construct a state-of-the art facility for the Department of Corrections. Upon completion, the Colony and the State Lands swapped the former Northern Nevada Restitution Center (2595 E. 2nd St.) and the site of the new facility (225 Sunshine Ln.).

This dynamic, multifaceted public-private collaboration sprung from a need to expand health services to the RSIC’s 1,143 tribal members as well as the Northern Nevada Urban Indian population.  Besides diversifying the Colony’s tax base from sole reliance on tobacco sales, the RSIC retail operations accounted for the construction of a $20 million health center.

In fact, last July, the RSIC celebrated its seventh year of operation of the Reno-Sparks Tribal Health Center, a direct result of this multi-agency collaboration. The 65,000 square-foot health center not only provides medical care for the RSIC tribal members, but for an additional 6,000 Northern Nevada Urban Indians.