Continued Air Quality Warnings, Long Valley Fire Nearly Contained

On Thursday, area health and emergency services authorizes issued continual warnings about air quality in the Reno-Sparks area.

Again today and through Friday, air quality is “unhealthy,” which means everyone can be affected. Those with heart/ lung disease and children and elders should stay indoors and everyone should avoid strenuous outdoor activities. Masks or N95 respirators are available throughout the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony.  (see below for specific departments)

As the Long Valley Fire winds down, our area is impacted by smoke from other fires.  The Long Valley Fire has not grown and is over 70 percent contained.

As we are still in the midst of wildfire season, please remember,  fire conditions can change without warning, and the situation remains dynamic. Residents living in or around the fire area should continue to monitor the situation for changes.

KOH AM radio 780 is our civil alert emergency radio. Tune in to get breaking news.

For more information, please contact RSIC Emergency Services Manager, David Hunkup at: dhunkup@rsic.org or phone (775) 997-3524.

The links below will take you to the up-to-date information on the Long Valley and other fires as well as road conditions and closures, plus air quality.

For more information:
Road Closures / Conditions
Wildfire Information
Air Quality Conditions

7/18/17 at 7 p.m.

 

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At 2:30 p.m., the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony’s Emergency Services distributed the following non-emergency alert due to regional wildfires and smoke:

Air quality is “unhealthy,” which means everyone can be affected. Those with heart/ lung disease and children and elders should stay indoors.

Everyone should avoid strenuous outdoor activities.

N95 respirators are available at the Reno-Sparks Tribal Health Center, Senior Center, Recreation and Administration, as well as the Hungry Valley Housing Department and  Recreation.

Clean air shelter with air conditioning is available at the RSTHC and the gyms in both Reno and Hungry Valley.

Use www.airnow.gov for the latest air quality conditions.

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The Long Valley Fire threat to HV has been reduced again, today.

At today’s  official briefing and planning meeting, it was announced:

•Evacuation advisory for Sutcliffe has been lifted.

•Nevada State Route 445 is open north of its intersection with Nevada State Route 446.

Please know, today’s strong winds and very low humidity could cause renewed fire behavior. The fire conditions could increase without warning, and the situation remains dynamic. Residents living in or around the fire area should continue to monitor the situation for changes.

Again, a red flag warning is in place until 8 p.m.

That means that the National Weather Service believes that conditions are ideal for wild land fire combustion, and rapid spread.

Our emergency responders will continue to monitor the situation and communicate with the area command posts. Please, stay alert.

KOH AM radio 780 is our civil alert emergency radio. Tune in to get breaking news.

For more information, please contact RSIC Emergency Services Manager, David Hunkup at: dhunkup@rsic.org or phone (775) 997-3524.

The links below will take you to the up-to-date information on the Long Valley and other fires as well as road conditions and closures.

For more information:
Road Closures / Conditions
Wildfire Information

7/18/17 at 4 p.m.

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At noon, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony’s Emergency Services distributed the following (sic) alert:

“This is an alert from the RSIC.  The Long Valley Fire is a minimal threat to HV. Our emergency responders will continue to monitor the situation and communicate with the area command posts. However, wildfire conditions can change rapidly and today is red flag warning day. Stay alert.”

7/17/17 12:08 p.m.

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At 10:30 p.m., the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony’s Emergency Services distributed the following (sic) alert:

“This is an alert from the RSIC.  Our emergency responders are monitoring the fire which can be seen from Hungry Valley. This fire is not a threat to HV. Crews will be working all night on this fire located on Tule Peak, north of HV.  The next planned fire update will be delivered at noon.

The next fire update will be delivered by Rapid alert, staff email and at www.rsic.org by noon on Monday, July 17.”

For up-to-date information on the Long Valley and other fires, please log onto: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5354/or for more information, please contact RSIC Emergency Services Manager, David Hunkup at: dhunkup@rsic.org or phone (775) 997-3524.

7/16/2017 @ 10:30 p.m.

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At 7 p.m., the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony’s Emergency Services distributed the following (sic) alert:

“The Long Valley fire is moving toward Pyramid Lake and likely will miss Hungry Valley.  Please remember, wildfire conditions can change rapidly.  Stay alert.  Our response team is monitoring the fire and communicating with the Long Valley Command Post.

The next fire update will be delivered by Rapid alert, staff email and at www.rsic.org by noon on Monday, July 17.

For up-to-date information on the Long Valley and other fires, please log onto: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5354/or for more information, please contact RSIC Emergency Services Manager, David Hunkup at: dhunkup@rsic.org or phone (775) 997-3524.

7/16/17 @7:22 p.m.

Each Labor Day, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony hosts the Numaga Indian Days Pow Wow

Numaga Pow Wow 2017

Each Labor Day weekend, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony hosts its nationally acclaimed Numaga Pow Wow. This free, family event features some of the best Native American dancers, singers and drummers in the country. Besides the memorable pow wow entertainment, over 25 vendors will be selling traditional native foods and stunning handcrafted silverwork, beadwork, baskets and other American Indian art.

In 2017, the 31st annual event, will be Sept. 1-3 in Hungry Valley. Hungry Valley is 19 miles north of downtown Reno and west of Spanish Springs, nestled in scenic Eagle Canyon.

The Grand Entry will start at 7 p.m., on Friday, noon and again at 7 p.m., on Saturday, then
at noon on Sunday.

Besides the traditional pow wow, the celebration includes the Numaga Indian Days Princess Pageant which will be held on Thursday, at 6 p.m.  Held at the Hungry Valley amphitheater, there are three categories: tiny tots (2-5 years-old), juniors (6-11 years-old) and teens (12-17 years-old).

The entire weekend celebration is named after Chief Numaga, the famous Paiute leader, known for peace. Chief Numaga was a great 19th century trailblazer who had the courage and the vision to counsel against war.  Facing severe threats to his people by invading settlers and military, Numaga repeatedly chose peace. His successful peace negotiations, helped set a precedent for future disputes.

Numaga also has a documented history of trying to prevent the destruction of our aboriginal lands. Numaga called the pine nut groves, the Indian’s orchards and asked non-Indians to collect fallen timber instead of cutting down healthy trees, an issue still impacting Indian Country today.  Unfortunately, Numaga’s early advocacy for Mother Earth was not successful.

Translated from the English language, Numaga means “Give Food.”  He passed away in 1871 and is buried in the hills near Wadsworth.

ABOUT THE COLONY
The RSIC was established in the early 1900’s and formed a federally recognized government in 1934 under the Indian Reorganization Act. Located in Reno, Nev., the RSIC consists of over 1,100 members from three Great Basin Tribes – the Paiute, the Shoshone, and the Washoe and provides essential services to over 7,000 Natives. The reservation lands consist of the original twenty-eight acre Colony located in central west Reno and another 1,920 acres in Hungry Valley, which is nineteen miles north of the Colony and west of Spanish Springs, Nev., nestled in scenic Eagle Canyon.                    

For more information about the Numaga Indian Days Pow Wow, the RSIC community, culture, departments, economic developments, business opportunities and services, please contact Stacey Montooth at 775/329-2936, ext. 3268 or at smontooth@rsic.org .

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony strives for a strong community that promotes and encourages individual spiritual, physical and emotional health to foster a long, abundant and prosperous life, which will lead to personal, family and community responsibility and prosperity.

 

 

 

 

Colony to Allow Passive Recreation in Hungry Valley

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Tribal Council will allow certain uses by the public of the 13,343 acres the tribe recently reacquired under the Nevada Native Nations Land Act.

Allowed & Prohibited Use Hungry Valley Map

With a priority on better land management, the RSIC Tribal Council passed a resolution which allows for nondestructive, peaceful uses of the lands such as hiking, bicycling, horseback riding, day parking of vehicles in designated areas, geocaching, and cross country running, without the need of a permit.

“We want to establish good relationships with the whole community,” said Chairman Arlan D. Melendez. “Though we expected a longer time frame to transition the management of the land with the Bureau of Land Management, our goal is to inform and work closely with our neighbors as we manage our land in Hungry Valley.”

In addition, the RSIC leadership restated unacceptable activity on the land including: dumping, target shooting, random discharge of firearms, hunting, camping without a permit, camp fires and other fires, use of fireworks, disturbance of cultural sites, or use of alcohol.

Furthermore, the Colony will allow all-terrain vehicles (e.g., quads, utility terrain vehicles or motorcycles) only to pass through the land on a designated route to outside use areas, and for the period ending Dec. 31, 2017, will allow these all-terrain vehicles on certain established trails within a designated areas in the Hungry Valley addition adjacent to Spanish Springs.

A map with those designated areas will be posted soon on the RSIC website: www.rsic.org and at the existing kiosks on those lands.

We appreciate the patience and understanding of the general public as we take necessary steps to allow the land to recover and heal due to overuse from multiple activities,” Melendez said. “We have identified a number of priorities and our staff will be working on these so we can better manage our land.”

This management plan includes designating emergency access and evacuations routes,

completing an exterior boundary survey in coordination with BLM, installing information
signage, inventory of environmental and cultural resources, and development of a
transportation plan.All uses will be considered again by the Tribal Council before Dec. 31, 2017.“Our resolution allows us to monitor the land usage, reevaluate and modify or extend this policy,” Chairman Melendez said.

July at the RSIC

…art, exercise, advisory committees, appreciation, reading, beading, aquacize and more during the month of July at the RSIC.

3 MONDAY
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 3 p.m.
Enrollment Advisory Committee meeting, Enrollment Office, 5:30 p.m.

4 TUESDAY
Fourth of July RSIC Administration Offices closed

5 WEDNESDAY
Adult Kickboxing, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Speed and Agility Training, 3NWC, 5 p.m.
Law & Order Committee Meeting, Tribal Court, 6 p.m.

6 THURSDAY
Elder Hot Springs Trip, Leave from Senior Center, 9 a.m.
Blood Drive, RSTHC, 10 a.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
RSIC Pow Wow Club, RSTHC, 6 p.m.

7 FRIDAY
Native Art Classes, Behavioral Health Division, 9 a.m.
Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Spartan Training, RSTHC, 5 p.m.

8 SATURDAY
Great Basin Native American Cultural Fair, RSIC Colony Gym, 10 a.m.

10 MONDAY
Education Advisory Committee meeting, Education Conference Room, Noon
Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 3 p.m.
RSIC Pow Wow Club, Hungry Valley Rec, 6 p.m.

11 TUESDAY
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Summer Reading Program, Hungry Valley or Reno Education Departments, 9:30 a.m.
Discover Paiute Story Telling, Artown, McKinley Arts Center, 925 Riverside Dr., 9:30 a.m. Self Defense Class, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 5 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:15 p.m. Yoga, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Eagle Wings Recruitment, Hungry Valley Rec, 6 p.m.

12 WEDNESDAY
Summer Reading Program, Hungry Valley or Reno Education Departments, 9:30 a.m.
Adult Kickboxing, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Speed and Agility Training, 3NWC, 5 p.m.
Tribal Council Meeting, 34 Reservation Road, 6 p.m.

13 THURSDAY
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Summer Reading Program, Hungry Valley or Reno Education Departments, 9:30 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Beading Circle With a Twist, Hungry Valley Recreation, 6 p.m.

14 FRIDAY
Native Art Classes, Behavioral Health Division, 9 a.m.
Native Wellness Talking Circle, Tribal Court Building, 1 p.m.

15 SATURDAY
The Culture of Weaving: Traditional Baskets in Transition exhibit, THPO/Cultural Resource Program Office, 10 a.m.

17 MONDAY
Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 3 p.m.
Executive Health Board meeting, RSTHC, 5:30 p.m.

18 TUESDAY
Commodity Distribution, Senior Center, 8 a.m.
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.

19 WEDNESDAY
Summer Reading Program, Hungry Valley or Reno Education Departments, 9:30 a.m.
Adult Kickboxing, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Speed and Agility Training, 3NWC, 5 p.m.

20 THURSDAY
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Elder Hot Springs Trip, Leave from Senior Center, 9 a.m.
Summer Reading Program, Hungry Valley or Reno Education Departments, 9:30 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
RSIC Pow Wow Club, RSTHC, 6 p.m.

21 FRIDAY
Native Art Classes, Behavioral Health Division, 9 a.m.
Spartan Training, RSTHC, 5 p.m.

24 MONDAY
Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 3 p.m.
School Supply Distribution Kick Off, Hungry Valley Education, 5 p.m.
Native Women’s Group, Healing to Wellness Outreach, Tribal court, 5:30 p.m.
Housing Advisory Board Meeting, Housing Office, 6 p.m.
RSIC Pow Wow Club, Hungry Valley Rec, 6 p.m.

25 TUESDAY
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m. Self Defense Class, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m. Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 5 p.m. School Supply Distribution Kick Off, RSIC Education, 5 p.m. Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:15 p.m. Yoga, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m. Eagle Wings Recruitment, Hungry Valley Rec, 6 p.m.

26 WEDNESDAY
Adult Kickboxing, 3NWC, 12:15 p.m.
Senior Numa (Paiute) Language Class, RSIC Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Speed and Agility Training, 3NWC, 5 p.m.
Economic Development Meeting, 34 Reservation Road, 6 p.m.

27 THURSDAY
Elder Aquacize, 55-years+, Alf Sorensen, 1400 Baring Blvd., Sparks, 9 a.m.
Yoga, 3NWC, 12:10 p.m.
Talking Circle, RSTHC Behavioral Health Division, 4 p.m.
Line Dancing, 3NWC, 5:30 p.m.
Beading Circle With a Twist, Hungry Valley Recreation, 6 p.m.

28 FRIDAY
Employee Appreciation Day, RSIC Offices Closed

31 MONDAY
Fit For Life, Senior Center, 12:30 p.m.
Free DUI Education Program, RSTHC Behavior Health, 3 p.m.
Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Artown Cultural Sharing, Wingfield Park, 200 West 1st St., 4 p.m.
Artown Closing: A Tribe Called Red, Wingfield Park, 200 West 1st St., 7:30 p.m.
Rabies Vaccination Clinics for Dogs and Cats, Hungry Valley Community Center
and 34 Reservation Rd., 3 p.m.

 

as of 7/3/17

 

Inaugural Native American Basketball Showcase Gives Student Athletes Chance to Perform

Native American basketball showcase gives players a chance to show their skills
(click link to News 4 coverage)

In an effort to promote and show public support for young people, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony invited 50 student athletes and a dozen educators to coach these players in the 1st Annual All-Native American High School Basketball Showcase.

Among the United States’ 565 federal recognized American Indian tribes, Native Americans are the most under-represented ethnicity on college athletics teams. Despite the difficulties finding their way onto an NCAA team, let alone becoming a high profile athlete, history is dotted with famous Native Americans athletes and their noteworthy accomplishments.

In the 20th century, Jim Thorpe, a Sac & Fox Indian, won two Olympic gold medals, played professional baseball and football and became the first president of the league that would become the NFL. Billy Mills, a Sioux who came off the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, scored one of the biggest upsets in Olympic history when he won the 10,000 meters in 1964.

Just last March, the NCAA Basketball Championships featured Native American standout players including: Bronson Koenig, Derek Willis, Lindy Waters III, Caitlyn Ramirez, and Chelsea Dungee.

Locally,  MorningRose Tobey plays for the University of Nevada Women’s basketball team, while Angelica Shanrock, a 2017 graduate of Spanish Springs High, signed a letter of intent to play colligate ball at College of Skskiyous.

 

All My Relaytions Completes Reno-Tahoe Odyssey Relay Run

Captained by the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony’s Toby Stump,  the 11-member, all Native American team, All My Relaytions completed the 178-mile run that goes around Lake Tahoe, through the Carson Valley, up to Virginia City, and back to the finish line at Idlewild Park in Reno.

In addition to the RSIC Tribal Council, several RSIC departments contributed to sponsoring the team including the Reno-Sparks Tribal Health Center, the RSIC Education and Recreation Department.

Starting from downtown Reno on Friday at 10 a.m., the team crossed the finish line about 3 p.m., on Saturday.

Starting the run, RSIC’s Chandler Sampson, wearing headphones, starts the first leg of the  178-mile Reno Tahoe Odyssey Adventure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Future Spaghetti Bowl Design, Construction Studied; Severe Impact at RSIC Likely

Anyone who has used the Interstate 80/Interstate 580 interchange, or the Spaghetti Bowl, knows that this area is the Achilles’ heel of Reno – Sparks roadways.

Originally constructed between 1969 and 1971 for a metropolitan population of about 130,000 people, the interchange now sees about 118,000 vehicles daily on I-80 just west of the Spaghetti Bowl, while another 102,000 travel U.S. 395 just north of the interchange, according to the Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT).

The Washoe County Consensus Forecast, a written report of projected population, forecasted growth rate exceeding state and national averages though 2030. According to this same report, the population of Washoe County is projected to be 548,159 people in 2036.

The number of collisions at the Spaghetti Bowl nearly doubled in the last five years, growing from 598 crashes in 2011 to 1,060 in 2015.

Additionally, someone was injured in a crash near the interchange almost every day in 2015.

These alarming statics compelled Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval to emphasize, during his 2017 state of state address, the need for safety measures for the interchange.

So, NDOT and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), in cooperation with the Regional Transportation Commission (RTC) will be proposing improvements, specifically to reconstruct the interchange, to accommodate the future travel demands in Washoe County.

According to project’s website, the plan is expected to increase safety and improve operations for both current and future traffic needs.

However, for citizens and community members of the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, this potentially $500 million project which is projected to be designed by 2020 and constructed by 2030, might mean smoother highway traffic patterns, but the reconfiguration of nearby exits might negatively impact the Tribe as well.

“For over 100 years, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony has worked to improve the quality of life for its Tribal members and to develop a self-sufficient economy,” said Chairman Arlan D. Melendez. “Our tribal members rely on the East 2nd street and Glendale avenue interchange to access their homes and to obtain government and health care services.”

Chairman Melendez explained that a closure or change in access to these critical exits / entries could negatively impact the tribal members’ ability to access areas off the reservation for employment and personal needs.

He said that increased traffic would cause a domino effect increasing traffic on Golden lane and Reservation road through established neighborhoods, educational and government facilities.

Moreover, Chairman Melendez noted that regional partners along with the RSIC have spent millions of dollars to redevelop and improve former blighted properties near the current Spaghetti Bowl. These improvements have helped advance local government plans and development goals, and federal policies toward tribes.

“The East 2nd street, Glendale avenue interchange provides critical access for customers visiting Tribal Enterprises and businesses like our smoke shops and Walmart at Three Nations Plaza,” Chairman Melendez said. “Any temporary disruption for businesses during construction activities will negatively impact our tribal government revenues.”

Chairman Melendez said that this construction along with the final design, could have a significant, long-term impact on tribal employment and future employment, which are directly tied to tribal revenues.

However, the planning design, as well as future construction for the Spaghetti Bowl requires compliance with the federal law, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

NEPA requires federal agencies including the FHWA, to assess the environmental effects of a proposed project prior to making decisions. It establishes a framework for environmental review and ensures public and agency participation in the process. Finally, the federal process is intended to help agencies like NDOT and RTC, consider environmental consequences and avoid, minimize, or mitigate environmental impact. The NEPA process for the Spaghetti Bowl project began in March and is expected to continue through May 2020.

Indian Country has great concern as to the environmental impacts to the earth; but the negative social and economic impacts are just as important.

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the range of actions covered by NEPA is broad and includes making decisions on permit applications and constructing highways and other publicly-owned facilities. The possibility of fast-tracking through the NEPA has already been suggested.

In January, a board member for NDOT asked whether the state might escape those intensive environmental studies under an executive order signed by United States President Donald Trump. The board member said that the intent of that order was that all public projects would be exempt from the environmental process.

However, NDOT Director Rudy Malfabon said that he doubts the Spaghetti Bowl could be exempted because of “significant issues with the river and tribal lands…” as Interstate 80 goes over the Truckee River and the freeway passes right next to the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony. Malfabon also told the Northern Nevada Business Weekly that federal money will finance up to 90 percent of the project and bonds should cover the rest.

Malfabon and NDOT Senior Project Manager Nick Johnson outlined seven goals for the improvements which include:

1. Accelerated Delivery: Complete NEPA in 3-and-a-half years or less
2. Long Term Relief: Develop ultimate project to meet 2040 demands
3. Public Support: Secure endorsement from local governments and a favorable opinion from the public
4. Right-of-Way: Minimize displacements
5. Safety: Prioritize project based on eliminating/reducing high accident areas
6. Operations: Create interchange system fully functional and easily navigable within project limits
7. Aesthetics: Enhance the community’s driving experience through visually appealing improvements to the project area

 

 

National Museum of the American Indian Director Visits Reno-Sparks Indian Colony

The Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) has been charged by Congress with building a National Native American Veterans Memorial, and on Monday, veterans and had a chance to comment on the pending design and construction.

Native Americans have served in the United States military in every major conflict since the Revolutionary War. In recent decades, they have served in greater numbers per capita than any other ethnic group.

So, the museum has begun preliminary plans to construct this memorial in the next four years to give all Americans the opportunity to learn of the proud and courageous tradition of service of Native Americans in the Armed Forces of the United States.

The NMAI and the advisory committee are currently conducting consultations to share plans for the memorial and to seek input and support. Regional events, like the one being held at the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony (RSIC), bring together tribal leaders, Native veterans, and community members.

RSIC Tribal Chairman Arlan D. Melendez, a Marine Corps veteran, co-hosted a consultation for the memorial at the Reno-Sparks Tribal Health Care Center on May 1.  Veterans, their family members, professionals whom work with veterans and members of the community attended.
The service and sacrifice of Native American veterans, including American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians, spans nearly two and a half centuries of American history. During World War II, over 44,000 Native Americans served in the U.S. military. Hundreds of Hopi, Navajo, Comanche, and other Native language speakers—Code Talkers—played a crucial role. More than 42,000 Native Americans served during the Vietnam War.

Today, the U.S. Department of Defense estimates more than 24,000 American Indian and Alaska Native men and women are on active duty, and more than 150,000 veterans self-identify as American Indian or Alaska Native.

An advisory committee for the memorial has been formed, led by the Honorable Ben Nighthorse Campbell (Northern Cheyenne) and Chickasaw Nation Lieutenant Governor Jefferson Keel. The group, composed of tribal leaders and veterans from across Native America, is assisting with outreach to communities and veterans and advising on plans for the memorial.

In the fall of 2020, the museum will launch a juried competition to select a design for the memorial. The National Native American Veterans Memorial will be located prominently on the museum’s grounds on the National Mall, between the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum and the U.S. Capitol. The dedication ceremony is planned for Veterans Day 2020, to unveil the memorial and honor the immense contributions and patriotism of Native Americans in the U.S. Armed Forces.

Nominations to Serve on Secretarial Election Board Needed

The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Tribal Council is soliciting nominations of Colony members to fill three positions on the Secretarial Election Board. The Board consists of a Chairman (most likely Robert “RJ” Eben, the BIA Western Nevada Agency Superintendent), two BIA personnel, and three Colony members.

This Election Board is separate from the RSIC Election Board. The Board will only be active if the Tribal Council makes a formal request to the BIA to hold a Secretarial Election.

The Secretarial Election Board’s main functions include deciding appeals on whether someone is eligible to be a registered voter for this election and deciding challenges to the election results, and several pre-election actions such as establishing deadlines and posting election results, and may include assisting the BIA with sending correspondence to members.

Minimum qualifications for these positions are that the individual must be an enrolled Colony member at least 18 years of age.

If you, or someone you know, are interested in serving on this Election Board, please send a written request to Arlan D. Melendez, Chairman of RSIC no later than April 25, 2017. The three individuals to fill these positions will be selected by the Tribal Council.

New Hungry Valley Borders

In accordance with the Nevada Native Nations Land Act, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony Tribal Council, along with Tribal Police and Hungry Valley Fire departments wish to remind all community members that the RSIC now has jurisdiction of the 15,354 acres in the Valley.

If you see or hear illegal activities—shooting, dumping, alcohol use, or off-road vehicle activity outside designated routes and areas, please call the tribal police at 323-2677 or 240-9775.

Allowed & Prohibited Use Map
Nevada Native Nations Act – Public Law-114publ232